Pete Williamson’s amazing photos of boats and boatbuilding in Vietnam

Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders

Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders

Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders

Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders

Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders Pete Williamson's photos of Vietnam boats and boatbuilders

This remarkable set of photographs from a boatyard on the Vietnamese island of Kim Bong were taken by Pete Williamson recently while on holiday in the area. They are published with his permission.

Here’s what he says:

‘The islands of Kim Bong and Thanh Ha on the Thu Bon river near Hoi An are I believe subsidised to preserve the crafts and way of life of the people, and are a major tourist attraction.

‘The wooden boat would apparently take three months to build, and sell for $1000 US!

‘The ”coracles” are in some ways similar to Welsh coracles, but lack the plank seat, have a woven skin and are propelled by rocking rather than paddled. They are apparently raced but are also used to remove the fish caught in the large nets seen in the river.

‘Regards, Pete’

Thanks Pete! Some great shots of boatbuilding in Vietnam here – the net is particularly beautiful, and the boats themselves are extraordinary – I’ve never seen trunnels used this way before, except as a way of demonstrating that it’s possible.

In fact I’ve recently been given a number of photos from Vietnam, and will post some more of them shortly.

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A new yard building ‘zompen’ sailing barges at Enter, in Holland

Boatyard at Enter, Netherlands

Boatyard at Enter, Netherlands the first zomp Boatyard at Enter Boatyard at Enter

Boatyard at Enter Boatyard at Enter, Holland

Hans-Christian Rieck took a trip to a modern boatyard at Enter in Holland, which he rightly argues shows the value of maintaining historic boatyards. Take note Swale planners and Faversham councillors!

Here’s what Hans has to say.

‘From the 17th century river traffic in the east of the Netherlands and the north west of Germany was carried out mostly using a working craft known as a zomp. The little ships worked the rivers Berkel, Regge, Schipbeek, Dinkel and Vechte. They were about 12m long and could carry a load of about 10 tones.

‘From the 1850s onwards bigger canals were built and the rivers were made more easily navigable, and so larger hips with bigger payloads came into use. The zompen as a type came under pressure, and within one generation the disappeared almost completly. The last original zomp was kept in a museum in Arnheim in 1940, when it was hit by a grenade during Operation Market Garden and badly damaged.

‘But the Dutch are proud of their maritime heritage and the remains of the last zomp were preserved. In the 1980s Dr G-J Schutten made a reconstructed drawing of the lines of the old zomp and published them, which awakened a great deal of interest in the little village of Enter, which has a long history of involvement with the zomp trade.

‘During the 19th century, of 150 families in the village 120 were involved in shipping goods using zompen. By tradition, at Christmas every zomp skipper had to be at home to attend church, and it must have been an impressive picture, seeing 120 ships packed into such a small port!

‘To keep the history alive, the inhabitants of Enter decided to reconstruct the old zomp and with the help of Dr Schutten in 1984 a wooden boatyard in Giethoorn built the first new zomp for over 100 years – it is now used for carrying tourists along the River Regge.

‘But the brave folks of Enter wanted more a shipyard of their own, where they could build their own zompen – and they were successful. In 2009 the Zomp Wharf in Enter opened its doors.

‘It is a paradise of wooden boatbuilding, with steamed planks an inch thick and frames of grown oak, and a team of old-time shipwrights keep up the tradition of woodworking. If ever you are around the Regio Twente in the Netherlands go to Enter and visit the wharf. It will be worth it, I promise you.’

Thanks Hans! See the project website: http://www.entersezomp.nl.

 

Paul Connor’s photos from the Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival at the Centre for Wooden Boats, Seattle

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Herreshoff_ketch

Paul Connor has also kindly sent us a set of photos of a festival dockside stroll – this time from the Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival at the Centre for Wooden Boat’s base in Seattle. Thanks Paul and sorry about the delay – I’ve been away sailing – it tends to happen at this time of year, so please don’t think the worst if the weblog goes quiet for a few days.

I particularly like the H12 1/2 – if anyone doesn’t I think they probably need to pray for their soul…

Paul is working towards building a double-ended skiff based on the plans for a double-ended skiff presented in the book Boatbuilding for Amateurs. Click here for more on this project. I’ve added labels where the boat concerned is identified.

If anyone would like to add any comments or information, please do so using the comments link at the end of this post.

Alien_queen AQ_boiler AQ_controls

Barnacle Chriscraft_fwd

H12-5_side H12-5_quarter H12-5_interior

H12-5_fwd

H12 1/2

Hvalsoe_13 Hvalsoe_16

Hvalsoe 13 and 16

Magic_Wing Magic_wing_Side Matinicus_peapod

Little Wing and a peapod

Melonseed

Melonseed

Sea_Dog_Aft Sea_Dog_Fwd Sea_Dog_Transom

Unknown

Unknown – but it looks like a huge Paradox. Is it a heavy sharpie of the Hog Fish Lips type?