Colin Archer RS14 roars through rough sea

If you’ve ever wondered what a superbly bouyant  Colin Archer looks like when sailing in the weather for which it was designed, now’s your chance to see one on YouTube. It’s bloody marvellous!

My thanks to Jim Van Den Bos for pointing it out.

Advertisements

Impressions of the Norfolk Broads, summer 2011, part II: Horsey Mere and the sea


Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 21

Tonight we have a few more photos from our trip to the Norfolk Broads just over a week ago (see the previous instalment here). I’m still smiling…

Most of the photos in this post were taken on an unforgettable balmy summer evening at Horsey Mere, which is looked after and managed by the National Trust – and an excellent job they make of it. Apart from the windmill and a little cafe, there are even some wonderfully welcome showers for visiting boat users. It’s a real example of what could be done elsewhere.

I should add that there is also the splendid Nelson’s Head pub just a pleasant stroll away…

Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 9 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 11 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 17.

Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 12 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 14 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 19

Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 18 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 16 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 23

Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 15 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 22 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 25

Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 24 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 26

And finally – a walk to the beach just a mile from the Mere. It seems so strange to sail on inland lakes and yet be so close to the sea.

Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 27 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 28 Horsey Mere Broads trip photos 29

 

 

Gadfly II restoration makes progress

[ad name=”intheboatshed-post”]

DSCF0055

Simon Papendick and family make progress on their project to restore Gadfly II

DSCF0007 DSCF0009 DSCF0023

DSCF0026 DSCF0046 DSCF0049

DSCF0079

I’m grateful to Simon Papendick for getting in contact to report on his progress in bringing Gadfly II back to life.

Gadfly II looks very much like a Blackwater sloop but is reported to have been built in Kent rather than Essex, and there are some intriguing clues to her history, including a 1908 coin under her mast. For more on this read some previous posts on this topic.

Here’s what Simon has to say:

‘Hi Gavin,

‘Since I contacted you last I have got on well with the restoration on Gadfly II. We’re getting close to finishing the outside with the deck all but finished. The hull is all caulked up with putty in the seams, the hull has been glossed and the first coat of antifouling is on the bottom.

‘One of the last jobs to do before the boat goes back in the water will be the replacing the keel bolts, which is going to be done in a couple of weeks time at a local boatyard close to our home. Once the keelbolts are done and the boat is watertight then I will fit out the inside with an interior very close to what it would have had when it was first built.

‘After the boat is re-launched I will have the mast stepped and take it for its first sail in many years. From what I was told by its last owner its last sail could well have been 20 years ago or more.

‘It will be a wonderful experience for both the boat and myself to get the boat back to where she should be gracing the East Coast again after all these years. As you can see from the photos it is a family affair.

‘Regards

‘Simon Papendick’

Many thanks Simon. I’m pleased to hear that you’re planning to be true to the original when you start work on the interior, and I think it’s particularly good that you have your family’s help and support – so many people seem to work in isolation.

Make sure you don’t miss anything good. Support intheboatshed.net by subscribing to our free weekly email news letter now!