Impressions of the Norfolk Broads, summer 2011, part II: Horsey Mere and the sea


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Tonight we have a few more photos from our trip to the Norfolk Broads just over a week ago (see the previous instalment here). I’m still smiling…

Most of the photos in this post were taken on an unforgettable balmy summer evening at Horsey Mere, which is looked after and managed by the National Trust – and an excellent job they make of it. Apart from the windmill and a little cafe, there are even some wonderfully welcome showers for visiting boat users. It’s a real example of what could be done elsewhere.

I should add that there is also the splendid Nelson’s Head pub just a pleasant stroll away…

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And finally – a walk to the beach just a mile from the Mere. It seems so strange to sail on inland lakes and yet be so close to the sea.

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4 thoughts on “Impressions of the Norfolk Broads, summer 2011, part II: Horsey Mere and the sea”

  1. To my everlasting regret I have never sailed on the Broads, but It is certainly high on my bucket list – thanks for the great photo incentive Gav

  2. It looks very similar to the West Frisian Lakes in the Netherlands. Both have the same origin I think. They were bogland were peat was cut. With the rising of the sea level in the Middle Ages they were flooded. In East Frisia the force of the North Sea was so fierce that the water smashed the small one mile barriers between the lakes and the open sea which led to massive losses of land during the late Middle Ages. In a 600 year long fight the Frisian farmers reclaimed the land from the sea with a large system of dykes, ditches, locks and pump stations. So there are these kind of lakes in England, the Netherlands but not in Germany.

  3. During the 1970's Erith Yacht Club used to take their "Hamble Star" dinghies to Holland to sail / cruise on the lakes. The Hamble Stars are still at Erith (many 60+ years old) but i am not sure if they make the trip to Holland any longer.

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