Model-making progress and drawings of Paul Connor’s Practical Boatbuilding skiff project

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The 10ft double-ended skiff model

Paul Connor has kindly sent a photo of his model of the 10ft double-ended skiff from Practical Boatbuilding for Amateurs, together with his extensive set of computer-generated construction drawings.

There’s a good amount of background to this project. The original drawings and information from Practical Boatbuilding  are here, an earlier intheboatshed.net post on the model project is here and two threads discussing the Practical Boatbuilding skiff and Paul’s project are here and here.

For Paul, the model is a proof of concept that shows the boat can be made at full size using the clinker ply technique, but I think many people will enjoy making a model of this little boat. I hope they do.

I think the model shows two things. The point that a boat built the these old plans is practical and will be beautiful is clearly the first, but the second is that in my opinion the boat itself would be even more elegant and better in the water if made 12-18 inches longer on the same beam and draught.

Download Paul’s pdfs of the drawings here: sheet-1; sheet-2; sheet-3; sheet-4; sheet-5; sheet-6; sheet-7; sheet-8; sheet-9; sheet-10; sheet-11; sheet-12; sheet-13; sheet-14; sheet-15.

Many thanks Paul!

PS Readers interested in making a model of something simpler, might check out the free plans page!

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Paul Connor builds a model of the double-ended skiff from Practical Boatbuilding

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Paul Connor’s model of the double-ender from
Practical Boatbuilding for Amateurs

Intheboatshed.net reader Paul Connor is building a model of the attractive double-ended 10ft skiff from Practical Boatbuilding for Amateurs, which we posted some time ago.

The original post is here and a follow-up photograph of a similar boat built in the traditional way and seen at the Beale Park Boat Show is here.

At the time I described the plans as presenting a challenge, and said I was tempted to create a computer model in order to work up plans for building in ply epoxy. I’ve never got around to it, but Paul has taken up the gauntlet and is forging ahead with a sophisticated computer model from which he’s building the scale model (see above) and plans to go on to build the real thing.

Software-wise, he used Catia v5 for his initial modeling and a trial version of Rhino to develop the plank surfaces, and intends to make plans available for others wishing to make the model.

I think this is an interesting project and I will be very interested to see how it goes. In the meantime, Paul is posting his progress at the Wooden Boat Forum.

A challenge for boatbuilders: a sweet 10ft clinker-built double-ended skiff

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Panels drawings and coordinates for the 12ft flat-bottomed Ella rowing skiff

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Ella skiff, panel plotting, sheet 1

Tonight, I’ve finally managed to find some time to make a little more progress on the plans for the stitch and glue flat bottomed Ella rowing skiff. We now have four drawings to show where the panels that make up this stitch and glue-built boat fit on three 8 by 4ft sheets and one 4ft by 4ft sheet of ply; and we have four tables of coordinates to enable builders to markout and finally cut out their material, create the necessary taped or butt-strapped joints  before beginning assembly.

I won’t explain how stitch and glue works here as there’s a lot of material available on this both on the Internet and in books such as my Ultrasimple Boatbuilding – the only thing I’d say is please don’t try the process without reading about it properly first. That way lies sticky madness, strange-shaped boats and epoxy glop that won’t go off, as at least some people have found in the past. Just check the forums…

Here are the drawings files you’ll need: Ella skiff plans.

A few warnings are required here.

Prospective builders should be aware that I am not a qualified naval architect and that my plans are amateur and experimental. I accept no responsibility for any injury or loss arising from building or using this boat and I urge builders and users of this boat to do so with care.

This boat is not for use on the sea or in any hazardous conditions. It is a small boat suitable for rowing on small lakes and slow-flowing rivers. It may be rowed but should not be used with an outboard of any kind unless the stern is doubled and otherwise reinforced. Even if that were done, it would be dangerous to use an outboard of more than 1hp. This boat is not designed to hydroplane and should not be made to do so – far too many fatal accidents occur each year beause some bozo thought it was fun or safe to put a large engine on a boat for which it was not designed.

I would also ask builders that if any coordinate creates a line that does not appear as it does in the drawings to contact me immediately. You may have found an error, and will need corrected measurements to be able to go forward. Also, I will want to correct anything that is wrong for the sake of future builders. In general, if you build this boat, please contact me at gmatkin@gmail.com. Especially with the first few boats built, I will want to be in close touch in order to ensure the boats are successful and the plans cause no problems.

These plans aren’t entirely complete – for example, they don’t show where the oarlocks need to go, or specify the gunwales or inwales – and I haven’t written my usual short essay yet. All of that will come.

Finally, if after all this you are still interested in building this small, simple and perhaps elegant little boat, I would strongly suggest that you build a model first! Read all about making a model here and here. There is also more on the Ella skiff design including the preliminary drawings here.

PS – It’s become clear that depending on your build, some folks will find the thwart a little high – if that could be you, it will be a very simple job to make the seat lower if you do so at an early stage.

Complete plans will follow, so why not subscribe to intheboatshed.net?