Harbour stroll at Le Croisic, Brittany: boats, fishing blokes and a fairground ride

Brittany Le Croisic harbour fishing Brittany Le Croisic harbour wooden fishing boat

Mainly a holiday resort now, Le Croisic in Brittany has an impressive series of harbours and was a very different sort of place in the past.

Although most of the boats and yachts that use them these days are quite unlike those of fifty or a hundred years ago, there are a few treasures in among the white plastic, and the handsome circumnavigating Colin Archer-inspired yacht Kurun is certainly one. I loved the ancient monument sign on a boat; perhaps we should have them in the UK.

But what’s happening to the decaying fishing vessel? Isn’t it worth preserving and using? I remember when there were many more fishing boats in this area, and they were all tremendous carvel-built craft like this.

Brittany Le Croisic harbour sailing yacht Kurun Brittany Le Croisic harbour sailing yacht Kurun 2 Brittany Le Croisic harbour sailing yacht Kurun 3 Brittany Le Croisic harbour sailing yacht Kurun 5Brittany Le Croisic harbour Kurun 4 Brittany Le Croisic harbour building Brittany Le Croisic harbour building 2

Brittany Le Croisic harbour wooden fishing boat 3 Brittany Le Croisic harbour wooden fishing boat 2 Brittany Le Croisic harbour wooden fishing boat 4

Brittany Le Croisic harbour fishing 2 Brittany Le Croisic harbour boat 2 Brittany Le Croisic harbour boat

Brittany Le Croisic harbour boat 3 Brittany Le Croisic fairground ride featuring fishing boat Brittany Le Croisic fairground ride featuring fishing boat

 

 

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More of Matt Atkin’s Hong Kong photos

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

My brother Matt Atkin and his family are greatly enjoying living in Hong Kong, and he continues to take many photographs of the island itself and the Far East destinations he visits for work and on holiday.

He’s recently sent me an armful of photos of the boats of Thailand that I’ll put up shortly; in the meantime, here are some recent shots from Hong Kong.

See some earlier posts of Matts photos:

More of Matt Atkin’s photos of the boats and ships of Hong Kong’s harbours
Spectacular photos of working boats and houseboats in Hong Kong’s harbours

The boats of Hanoi, part 2

The boats of Hanoi, Vietnam

Alfred Corry, Southwold’s fabulous old lifeboat

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alfred corry, southwold, lifeboat, cromer, pier, henry blogg, john craigie, harbour, clinker, standing lug, dipping lug

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alfred corry, southwold, lifeboat, cromer, pier, henry blogg, john craigie, harbour, clinker, standing lug, dipping lug, clinging to rigging alfred corry, southwold, lifeboat, cromer, pier, henry blogg, john craigie, harbour, clinker, standing lug, dipping lug

One of Southwold’s best attractions for boat enthusiasts is the Alfred Corry Museum, a small museum by the harbour where the main attraction is the lifeboat named Alfred Corry itself.

The Alfred Corry came into use in 1893 and continued in service until it was withdrawn in 1918. Provided by the Lifeboat Institution, it was built at a time when it was customary to discuss the boat’s size, type and sail plan with local lifeboatmen. The result of their deliberations was that the boat should be and improved 44ft by 13ft Norfolk and Suffolk type, non-self-righting, and capable of being both rowed and sailed. It was to have five tons of water ballast (the boat itself weighed 8.3 tons), and 14 oars – though the finished boat actually had 16.

Not surprisingly, perhaps, the lifeboatmen had their new craft rigged like one of the local beach yawls and fishing punts, with a dipping lug on the foremast and a standing lug on the mizzen.

Over the two and a half decades following her launch, the Alfred Corry was launched 41 times on service, and saved 47 lives.

On retirement she had a long life as a yacht until she was abandoned on the Blackwater, from where she was rescued by John Craigie, great grandson of her original coxswain, also known as John Craigie. The Craigies began the process of repairing the boat (see a clip of her sailing as a yacht here); she has since been restored in her original lifeboat form under the auspices of a charitable trust.

The museum building itself has a story worth telling. Built in 1922 it previously stood on Cromer pier, where it was the home of that town’s lifeboat. It is said to have seen over 1000 lives saved and was of course associated with legendary and highly decorated lifeboatman coxswain Henry George Blogg.

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