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Peter Radclyffe talks about restoring a many decades old traditionally built boat made for the Mediterranean

Peter Radclyffe

Down on Elba, Peter Radclyffe talks about the issues involved in restoring and repairing a many decades old traditionally built boat made for the Mediterranean. I hope folks can see it, because he has some interesting points to make…

Australian Historical 10 Foot Skiff Class racing

My thanks to Earwegoagin for pointing out the existence of an extraordinary sailing sport I hadn’t previously imagined – the Australian Historical 10 foot Skiff Class (click here and here).

The skiffs are 10 ft long and carry as much sail area as their three man crews can cope with. No trapezes, leaning boards or ratchet blocks are allowed. With three blokes in a ten foot boat, they sometimes sit on the transom, at others I think they sit on each other…

 

Fully restored web size - Hendrick van Anthonissen (1606-after 1660), View of Scheveningen sands, with a stranded sperm whale, c. 1641, oil on panel © Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Restored Hendrick van Anthonissen painting reveals whale on Scheveningen beach

Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum’s gallery of Dutch Golden Age paintings has gone back on display display this week following a refurbishment – and includes the surprising image of a beached whale on Scheveningen beach that had previously been painted out.

The whale appears in a 1641 work by Hendrick van Anthonissen.

The beach at Scheveningen must be one of the most painted stretches of coast anywhere – this Googlewhack shows what I mean. Many of them contain fishing and other boats working from the beach, and often a fish market in operation. See an earlier post on this topic here.

PS – I have a modern example of a Scheveningen beach painting that my parents bought years ago on my wall. Can anyone tell me anything about it please? Who was the artist with the illegible signature?

Scheveningen beach with fishing boats

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Matthew Atkin photographs the working boats of Thailand

My globe-trotting photography enthusiast brother Matthew Atkin visited Thailand recently and came back with hundreds of shots of fishing and pleasure boats (the pleasure boats are the ones that have something to protect tourists from the sun).

This collection , which is just a sample, includes many of the famous colourful long-tailed boats, as well as little paddlers, and some other activities associated with fishing.

I must say that long-tailed engine arrangement continues to seem pretty scary, at least to me. All that weight high up is one thing that no boater will warm to, but another is the wide sweep of that propeller on the end of that long shaft.

Imagine how it could be in a man-overboard situation – or just with a number of boats at close quarters.

Thanks Matt! For more of my bruv’s  fabulous photos, click here.

D-Day landing sites, then and now

D-Day landing interactive The Guardian

This before-and-after interactive photo layout published by The Guardian featuring vessels involved in the Normandy landings during World War II is well worth a look.

A tip to the wise though: to see how each site looks today you have to click on the image, or even better swipe slowly from left to right to see the transition happening in a much slower and more subtle way.

The public talk about the options for Faversham Creek

Hundreds at the weekend attended the exhibition outlining the Faversham Creek Alliance’s alternative vision for the creek-side area. Here’s a short film revealing what some of them had to say about it, and the overwhelming feeling is that the proposal to build lots of housing, some shops and just a few workshops isn’t popular.

Meanwhile, things are clearly becoming difficult and shouty in the council chambers.

Old boats, traditional boats, boat building, restoration, the sea and the North Kent Coast – Gavin Atkin's weblog