Slipway Collective plans rowing gig Young Bristol return to Beale – by water!

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Rowing gig Young Bristol sees some action

Rowing gig Young Bristol sees some action Rowing gig Young Bristol sees some action Rowing gig Young Bristol sees some action

Win Cnoops has been in touch to say that he and his Slipway Collective colleagues hope to bring the completed and now well used Young Bristol back to the Beale Park Thames Boat Show. They are looking forward to showing the Cornish rowing gig to visitors who saw the boat last year, when it was still only half-built.

I gather she has been worked hard in the meantime, and has won two races. The photos of the gigs locking into Bristol Floating Harbour was taken after the Avon Gorge Race.

STOP PRESS! Win tells me the latest plan is to row Young Bristol 80 miles or so from Bristol to Beale Park, following the Kennet & Avon Canal and a bit of the Thames. Apparently the Bristol Gig Club sees it as a good exercise!

The Slipway Collective will also bring a finished Whisp and possibly a Jolly Boat.

For earlier posts about this boat, click here, here and here, and follow this link for more on the Slipway Coop folks: www.slipwaycooperative.co.uk.

Tickets for the Beale Park Thames Boat Show can be bought in advance online via the Beale Park website, or by phone on 0118 976 7498.

Take a look at our extensive coverage of last year’s Beale Park Boat Show.


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Four Months in a Sneak Box – a small boat or dinghy cruising classic

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Nathaniel Bishop’s sneak box

Bill Serjeant’s recent editorial on the Melonseed skiff reminded me of Nathaniel H Bishop’s account of a 2600-mile voyage down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, and along the Gulf of Mexico in a 12-ft sneak box, clearly a classic little duck hunting boat with a strong family resemblance to the Melonseed.

Titled Four Months in a Sneak-Box, it’s one of the classics of small boat sailing and can be read online here. Find out more about Nat Bishop and his amazing travels here.

It’s difficulty to guess how long this particular resource might remain available, so I’d suggest saving the text and drawings somewhere on your own computer – the home pages for this site are gone, which doesn’t bode at all well for the rest of the content.

There’s nothing like a little scatology in the early morning

So I was tickled by this post about boat-naming from the way Londoners do it from Messing about in Boats.