Photos of the traditional wooden clinker-built fleet of fishing boats at Hastings

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Quite a few of the traditional wooden clinker built boats survive among the beach-based fishing fleet at Hastings

These photos are part of a collection of shots I took of the beach boat fishing fleet at Hastings in the Easter Bank Holiday sunshine earlier this week. I’ll put up some more in the coming days.

Looking back, this is the first time I’ve photographed the boats in just over three years and I’m impressed that there seem to be almost as many of the traditional wooden clinker built beach boats as there were on my last visit. It’s particulary pleasing to see how many of the smaller boats are now being cared for and used by the local sea angling society, which seems to include some seriously hard working enthusiasts. Long may they prosper!

For more intheboatshed.net posts relating to Hastings and its fishing fleet, click here. I think you’ll find some interesting material.

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British Sea-Fishermen, by Anson – part III, from Lincolnshire to Cornwall

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Hastings beach pictured by Cristall in 1808

‘Hastings is one of the most interesting fishing centres on the South Coast and if one studies early 19th century paintings and drawings one realises that
Hastings beach cannot have changed very much in the past hundred years.
Even the boats have retained their general lines…’

Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen

Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen

Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen

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Fishing boats in a photo from Jeff Cole – but where are they?

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Jeff Cole’s fishing boats shot

Jeff’s old photo of fishing boats – but where are they? My sympathy goes out
to the two guys rowing in that light weather. Just how far did they have to row
that day before they found a breeze? 

Regular readers will remember that Jeff Cole has sent intheboatshed.net some great old photos from his collection – see them here – and has now turned up this dreamy little photo from an earlier time.

But where is the fishing station? Having thought about it for a while, and discussed the issue with my pal Steve Taylor (see comments below), we think this is Hastings, and that the structure on the right wall is the old harbour wall that was destroyed many decades ago.

RX is actually the code for the port of Rye, but the Hastings boats are registered as under the Rye authority.

By the way, this useful list of port letters may be useful some time when you’re trying to identify a fishing craft’s home port.