Ruel Parker writes about the Chesapeake Bay brogans

Brogan lines

I hadn’t heard about the log-built Chesapeake Bay brogan before, but I’m very struck by their beautiful lines and proportions. Of course I realise that the low sheerline isn’t there to make the boat attractive but to enable the oyster fishermen to reach the water to do their work, but still…

Read all about them in traditional boat author, historian, designer and boatbuilder Reuel Parker’s article on the Woodenboat magazine website. Here’s a sample:

‘I learned about brogans from MV Brewerton’s excellent book Chesapeake Bay Log Canoes and Bugeyes. While bugeyes were large—up to 80? on deck — the brogans were small — around 30? to 35? on deck. I wanted to design a modern version of the brogan—adapted for cold-molded construction for shoal-draft cruising — but didn’t get around to doing it until December of 2011.

Brogans were double-ended, beamy, of moderate displacement, and shoal-bodied with centerboards. They carried free-standing masts, very raked, with the mizzen raked markedly more than the main.

‘The only lines drawing I have ever found for a brogan came from Brewerton’s book (shown below). They show a very lovely, nearly symmetrical, easily-driven double-ended hull of excellent proportions.’

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WoodenBoat magazine sponsors St Ayles build

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WoodenBoat St Ayles story

We’re delighted to be able to report that the influence of the splendid Scottish Coastal Rowing Project based on designer Iain Oughtred’s St Ayles skiff seems to have spread to the USA.

What’s happened is that WoodenBoat magazine is sponsoring its local High School to build a St Ayles skiff, and that there may be St Ayles skiff building projects in the area in the near future – Alec Jordan, the brains behind the original project tells me he’s waiting for confirmation.

This is just another amazine achievement in what has been an amazing story over a period of about a year, and a huge amount of credit is due to Alec.To read the WoodenBoat magazine story, click here; there’s more to read also at the WoodenBoat forum.