Berths available for Integrity Iceland-Greenland trip

Will Stirling has written to share a very unusual opportunity…

Modern-built Victorian racing yacht Integrity sails from Iceland to East Greenland in the summer of 2019. The aim of the voyage is to practise good seamanship and mountaineering.

There are two berths available for a period of approximately two weeks each. The usual conditions of engagement apply; nothing is beyond the call of duty.

Those interested to contact info@stirlingandson.co.uk with a resume of relevant experience.

www.stirlingandson.co.uk
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Will Stirling and crew sail Integrity to the North of Iceland

Stirling & Son-built Victorian gentleman’s racing yacht Integrity sailing from Plymouth to the North of Iceland.

Will Stirling writes:

‘We have sailed Integrity from Plymouth to the North of Iceland.The videos show her:

  • on the W Coast of Ireland under full sail; topmast up, jack yard topsail, bowsprit at no. 1 fid position, no. 1 jib and flying jib.
  • rounding the most northerly point of Iceland under square sail. Topmast and bowsprit housed. She travels at a slower speed under square sail but it is comfortable and safe when it is downwind and windy.

Most interestingly, when we doubled this cape and had to harden up in order to meet the head marks for the ancient Viking anchorage of Leirhofn, we braced the square sail round, set the no. 2 jib and she sailed to windward.

When we decided that we would have to beat into the anchorage, we dipped the square sail onto the deck, left the no. 2 jib up and set the staysail and double reefed main (which gives an indication of the wind strength and how comfortably the square sail sets).’

Stirling & Son refurbish a Norwegian rescue vessel

JMJ80ft Norwegian search and rescue vessel, JMJ, is on the Stirling & Son slip for a two-year restoration in readiness for cruising and expeditions in the Arctic.

She was the first fully motorised rescue vessel operated by the Norwegian rescue service (Det Norske Redningselskapet) and worked from 1949 to 1978, during which time she saved more than 100 lives.  1949 seems very late for the Norwegians to launch their first motor-only rescue craft, but I guess that may reflect a deep affection for the Colin Archer type…

Oh, and Will Stirling has just qualified as a marine surveyor through the Lloyd’s Maritime Academy, with an average mark of 92 per cent! Congratulations Will!

Stirling and Son is at Devonport and Tavistock – see the company’s website here.