Carriacou sloops on Youtube

[ad name=”intheboatshed-post”]

Reader Larry Henry got in touch the other day to alert me to this video on YouTube promoting photographer Alexis Andrews’ two books (volumes I and II) celebrating the Carriacou sloops of Dominica. By January I expect to watch this daily, just wishing I could be anywhere that’s warm and bathed in the colours of summer!

One word of warning though – when I do watch it next it will be with the sound turned down. There are lots of videos on YouTube of the locals playing local music that I have to say is much more to my taste.

Don’t miss something good – sign up below to start receiving the weekly intheboatshed.net email newsletter.

Gadfly II restoration makes progress

[ad name=”intheboatshed-post”]

DSCF0055

Simon Papendick and family make progress on their project to restore Gadfly II

DSCF0007 DSCF0009 DSCF0023

DSCF0026 DSCF0046 DSCF0049

DSCF0079

I’m grateful to Simon Papendick for getting in contact to report on his progress in bringing Gadfly II back to life.

Gadfly II looks very much like a Blackwater sloop but is reported to have been built in Kent rather than Essex, and there are some intriguing clues to her history, including a 1908 coin under her mast. For more on this read some previous posts on this topic.

Here’s what Simon has to say:

‘Hi Gavin,

‘Since I contacted you last I have got on well with the restoration on Gadfly II. We’re getting close to finishing the outside with the deck all but finished. The hull is all caulked up with putty in the seams, the hull has been glossed and the first coat of antifouling is on the bottom.

‘One of the last jobs to do before the boat goes back in the water will be the replacing the keel bolts, which is going to be done in a couple of weeks time at a local boatyard close to our home. Once the keelbolts are done and the boat is watertight then I will fit out the inside with an interior very close to what it would have had when it was first built.

‘After the boat is re-launched I will have the mast stepped and take it for its first sail in many years. From what I was told by its last owner its last sail could well have been 20 years ago or more.

‘It will be a wonderful experience for both the boat and myself to get the boat back to where she should be gracing the East Coast again after all these years. As you can see from the photos it is a family affair.

‘Regards

‘Simon Papendick’

Many thanks Simon. I’m pleased to hear that you’re planning to be true to the original when you start work on the interior, and I think it’s particularly good that you have your family’s help and support – so many people seem to work in isolation.

Make sure you don’t miss anything good. Support intheboatshed.net by subscribing to our free weekly email news letter now!


Edwin Schoettle on catboats, Gavin Atkin on what’s wrong with yachts and yachties

[ad name=”intheboatshed-post”]

Schoettle on catboats11

Legendary catboat Silent Maid

Edwin Schoettle’s classic Sailing Craft published in 1928 is a fabulous big old book of nearly 800 pages – so I hope no-one will mind me posting a few of them. And perhaps my post will serve to keep the memory alight.

I’d like to explain why I’ve been thinking about the catboat lately.

I’ve complained for years that many yachties¬† motor or motor sail for much of the time and I’ve often wondered what the reason might be. Well, I’ve come to think that it isn’t laziness or a dislike of sailing. The reason why they’re reluctant to use their full sailplan is that they’re either sailing alone, or effectively doing so, and don’t want the fag of having to manage sails, winches and sheets as well as steer, navigate and keep a look out.¬† And because they’re not using their full sail plan their boats are slow without the help of its engine – and that’s why most yachties motor for much of the time.

Looked at another way, it’s because we’re using the wrong rigs.¬† Instead of the Bermudan sloop with a masthead rig, big foresail, winches and the rest, we could be using rigs that reduce the number of essential control lines to very few – the cat and the cat yawl.

Of course there’s a shortage of cat yawls outside of a few designers offering plans for relatively small boats aimed at the amateur builders, so I’ve been considering the experiences people have had with the catboat.

I’ve no experience with these boats and have no firm opinions to offer, but it’s interesting that Schoettle emerges as such a fan of the catboat. I’m inclined to think a modified form of catboat, perhaps one with the kind of capacious hull that’s long been normal in family cruising boats could be seriously useful to yachtsmen in the era of expensive fuel and growing environmental awareness.

Those who find it difficult to swallow the idea of the Bermudan sloop being replaced by a more old fashioned rig might thinking about the argument in a different way – instead of describing the cat or cat yawl rig of the future as being derived from historical yacht types or workboats, just think of them as big Lasers with heavy keels.

Read more about Silent Maid in a recent post at the weblog 70.8%.

Schoettle on catboats1 Schoettle on catboats2 Schoettle on catboats3

Schoettle on catboats4 Schoettle on catboats5 Schoettle on catboats6

Schoettle on catboats7 Schoettle on catboats8 Schoettle on catboats9

Schoettle on catboats10 Schoettle on catboats11 Schoettle on catboats12

Schoettle on catboats13 Schoettle on catboats14 Schoettle on catboats15

Schoettle on catboats16 Schoettle on catboats18 Schoettle on catboats19

Schoettle on catboats20 Schoettle on catboats21