Victorian racing cutter Leila receives a vicar’s blessing and the local community enjoys a party

  

The local vicar blest the splendid Victorian gentleman’s racing cutter Leila this past weekend, and hard-working Leila Sailing Trust crew responsible for restoring her showed visitors round the boat in Southwold Harbour this weekend.

I should say that the work has been carried out by Trust volunteers and local yard Harbour Marine Services, with funding support from the National Lottery.

Naturally, they also had a bit of a party at Southwold Sailing Club, not to mention a session in the old Harbour Inn. All in all it was a great outing, as you will have guessed, and it was great to run into Leila Sailing Trust stalward Rob Bull once again, as well as some local music pals.

I’ll put up some more photos of Southwold and roundabout shortly.

For more posts about Leila, click here.

 

Reprobate pirates celebrating at Southwold Sailing Club

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Does anyone know the story of gaff rigged cutter Medusa Bay please?

Medusa Bay

Medusa Bay Medusa Bay

A chap called Udo has been in touch to ask for information about a boat he has bought recently.

She’s a strip-planked 37ft gaff-rigged cutter named Medusa Bay and is currently in a marina at Hull – though he plans in the spring to sail her to Blankenberge, Belgium.

Udo was put in touch with intheboatshed.net because has been told that she was built at Faversham. We’ve since learned that she was actually built at Conyer, though her spars came from Faversham. Still, I’m sure Udo would be delighted to learn more about her story, and for any old photos readers may have to hand please!

PS Now in the autumn of 2012 Medusa Bay is for sale. Contact me at gmatkin@gmail.com, and I’ll put you in touch with the owner.

Will Stirling’s latest news – a classic cutter, an Arctic circumnavigation and popular dinghies

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Classic cutter Integrity's hull framing Stirling & Son

Walrus photographed in the Arctic by Will Stirling Stirling & Son General Purpose Dinghy

Cutter Integrity being framed, walrus photographed by Will Stirling in the Arctic, and the bows of a Stirling & Son general purpose dinghy.

The latest Stirling & Son newsletter makes it clear that the yard is as busy as ever.

Will writes that his building shed is dominated by Integrity, a replica 43ft gentleman’s cutter of circa 1880. A cruising racer, she’s a classic English cutter, and here design takes references from Fife’s Bloodhound, Nicholson’s Marigold, Beavor-Webb’s Partridge, Watson’s Vanduara and Dixon Kemp’s Zoraida.

The shape is now defined with all oak the frames up and three planks wrapped around each side. She is a speculative build, so if anyone out there wants to buy a newly built classic, Integrity offers an opportunity that doesn’t come by every day.

The Stirling & Son 9ft general purposes dinghies seem popular – three have been built this year – and the range has been extended with a 12ft version designed and being built to commission.

The company’s range of plans has been significantly expanded this year with six boats now available. Details of each plan pack are on the website.

John Gallagher who built the 12ft sailing dinghy Frolic on our first dinghy building course received an award at the Plymouth Classic Rally for the best new build of 2010.

On their 25th anniversary the South West Maritime History Society awarded four prizes in recognition of significant contribution to maritime history. Will was honoured to be selected for his ‘exceptional research and boatbuilding’ during the Alert and HMS Victory yawl projects.

The National Historic Ships photography competition has shortlisted a Stirling & Son photograph of the interior of the 17ft Tamar salmon boat completed in January of this year. Those shortlisted are to be judged on the 6th of October.

Despite all this activity, Will has also found time to go sailing – and has recently returned from his fourth Arctic voyage. This year, aboard the pilot cutter Dolphin, Roger Capps led a team of three including Will to the far east of Svalbard, making a landing on the particularly remote Storoya, before sailing north west to 80 51N, which is 550 miles from the North Pole. Unlike last year, there was little ice this year. We were able to visit small islands that in 2009 had been visible from a distance of 50 miles, refracted above the pack ice that surrounded them.

The lack of ice may explain the large number of polar bears seen in the area in comparison to the previous year. A circumnavigation was completed by passing through the Hinlopen Straights. We crossed the Barents Sea at an average speed of 3 knts, permanently close hauled, trying to make southing without going too far east, in order to avoid Russia. This resulted in the crew working to windward in F8 winds with waves to suit. They were pleased to reach Hammerfest and the dramatic fjords of the northern coast of Norway.

The next adventure will begin on the 10th of September when Will goes to Galway, Ireland in order to collect a Falmouth quay punt built before the Great War. The boat will receive working repairs before being sailed back to Plymouth where she will be hauled out for a more thorough restoration – she’s destined to become the Stirling family boat for estuary and coastal sailing.

Stirling & Son are based at Tavistock, Cornwall, and can be reached via their website or by phone on 01822 614259.