Leo Sampson videos Tally Ho restoration and repair

He is of course quite mad. But I like his taste in music as much as I like his taste in boats!

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Tally Ho has a new owner and a new future

The legendary Albert Strange designed 1927 Fastnet winner and cruising boat Tally Ho (see an earlier post here) has a new lease of life, thanks to the efforts of the Albert Strange Association, and to her new keeper, boat builder Leo Goolden originally from Bristol but now based in Washington State.

He has a website and weblog that many Intheboatshed.net readers might enjoy,  a Facebook page, and a YouTube account that already has a video of Tally Ho’s journey to  her new home (see above) and another of a visit he made before taking her on.

I’m in awe. I hope it works out beautifully, for both Leo and Tally Ho.

Tally Ho, Jolie Brise and Ilex: the story of the first three Fastnet races

Tally Ho

‘A hundred years ago public interest in yacht racing was widespread and the press, both dailies and periodicals, printed long articles covering races in and off shore. People came to sit on the headlands and watched in their thousands as well. Offshore ocean races did not favor the picnicing crowd ashore and the tales needed to be told by the sailors. Ocean crossings in small boats and private races between big boats got wide coverage in the 19th century. In the early twentieth century periodicals like The Rudder and Yachting Monthly took the lead in sponsoring and promoting ocean races, starting with the Bermuda Race off the US east coast and the Fastnet Race starting at Cowes, England.

‘The first three winners of the Fastnet Race were old boats of widely varying character and all three of these boats still exist 90 years later, all over 100 years old. Jolie Brise, 1925 winner as well as in 1929 and 1930, was built as a French pilot boat in 1913. Ilex, 1926 winner, was designed and built by Camper and Nicholson in 1899 as a yacht. Tally Ho, 1927 winner, was designed by Albert Strange in 1909 and built in 1910 as a cruiser from which the owner, a fishing fleet owner, could fish.’

Read the rest of Thad Danielson’s article here.  Read more about the historic Tally Ho and find out more about the Albert Strange Association’s efforts to give her a future here.