More of Jeff Cole’s grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago

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More of Jeff Coles’ grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago Brittania and Bona at Cowes 1898

‘From the Nore to Dover, 1898’ Yachts unidentified, Photomezzotype, no photo credit. Supplement to the Yachtsman No. 381, August 1898

Once again we have another set of fine old photos kindly sent to us by Jeff Cole, who has just returned from some holiday.

Click on each image for a larger and clearer view.

More of Jeff Coles’ grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago Satanita, Britannia and Meteor

Left to right: Satanita, Britannia and Meteor. ‘Start of the 1st class yachts’

This appears in a supplement to The Yachtsman, No 481, July 1900 . Photo credited to West & Son, Southsea

More of Jeff Coles’ grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago Britannia and Bona at Cowes

Britannia and Bona at Cowes. Published in a supplement to The Yachting World, May 1898. Photo by Kirk, Cowes

More of Jeff Coles’ grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago Satanita

‘The Satanita making a record at the new Thames Yacht Race’

Engraving possibly by Ame from a sketch by Barlow More, NTYC. There are 25 men on the weather rail, two on the wheel, one in the spray on the bow, and one in the crosstrees. Note the spectator ferry.

More of Jeff Coles’ grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago Freda

‘Freda winning the Heligoland race’.

There is no information on this Photomezzotype. There’s a very early iron warship in the background that Jeff thinks may be flying the Imperial German Flag. Note tumblehome, pierced for cannon, ships boats in davits slung out, one in the water alongside. Double fighting top. Definitely a transition craft. And is that a spectator ship in background?

More of Jeff Coles’ grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago Dierdre

Dierdre

There is no other information with this badly foxed pic, but note the crew in natty striped jerseys and white trousers. There is a large yacht astern and a warship behind. It’s hard to see, but the warship may be the type where the gun disapears behind a casing vertically for re-loading, which Jeff says was favoured by the French.

This book from Amazon looks interesting, but I haven’t found anything relevant to these particular photos:
The Camera’s Coast: Historic Images of Ship and Shore; In New England

Dennis Connors’ history of the America’s Cup is available from Amazon:
The America’s Cup: The History of Sailing’s Greatest Competition in the Twentieth Century

For more intheboatshed.net posts of photos, Photomezzotypes  and engravings like these, follow this link:

https://intheboatshed.net/?s=cole

5 thoughts on “More of Jeff Cole’s grand yachting photos from a hundred years ago”

  1. I bet those yachts had really heavy keels. That's why

    they look so brave with all that sail but they probably needed it must

    to move along.

  2. The deep and heavy keels are one factor Jim – but geometry is another. Hull volume is a cubic function and goes up much faster than sail area, which is a square function, which means that larger vessels with at least some form stability can stand up to a lot more sail area.

    It's also a key reason why when the wind rises small boats lose the ability to sail long before the big ones.

    Gav

  3. In the Freda pic the old warship may be being used as a lightship. In some other pix the Nore and Mouse lightships are used as the finish.

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