Tag Archives: yachting world

Steam yachts of a century ago, from Jeff Cole’s collection

DODO

 

VALHALLA ALBERTA, S.V.

Dodo, Valhalla and Consuelo

Today’s gallery of photos are of steam yachts, and they belong to a collection that Jeff Cole acquired back when he was a teenager.

Except for Dodo he says they are all private steam yachts, mostly photographed at Cowes, and wonders what what happened to them?

On some odd cuttings that came with the photos, GL Watson is mentioned as a popular designer, and Thames, South Coast, Irish and Clyde yards are mentioned as building this kind of craft.

Dodo on Windemere appears in a supplement to The Yachtsman no. 504 published in  December 1900. Photo by Brunskill of Windemere.

Alberta, owned by His Majesty the King of the Belgians appears in a supplement to The Yachtsman, no. 415, March 1899. Photo by J De Muevyuck.

Valhalla on hearing that she was third in an ocean race. Jeff thinks she may be a training ship. She appears in a supplement to Yachting World, June 1905. Photo by Illustration Bureau.

Consuelo appears in a supplement to The Yachtsman, no. 522, April 1901
Photo A. Debenham, Cowes. The warship in the background appears to have side-by-side funnels and two rigged masts. Aft, Jeff has identified what seems to be a gun extended at deckhouse level consistent with a barbette, and smaller traversing turrets below it, and so he thinks this is a Royal Sovereign Class shipHMS Royal Sovereign was flagship of the Channel Squadron round this time, so it could be her.

Ombra was owned by Baron Von Schroeder appears in a supplement to Yachting World, December 1902. The designer: GL Watson, the builder D&W Henderson. She’s described as a steel twin screw schooner, with a Thames measurement of : 267 tons, and 140 by 20.1 by 12.5ft. Photo Kirk & Sons, Cowes.

Vista was owned by Mr WS Hunter, and appears in a supplement to Yachting World, May 1905. She was designed and built by W White & Sons, and is described as a composite screw schooner of 95 tons Thames measurement, and 98.4 by 14.6 by 7.7ft. Photo by West of Southsea. She has a fleur de lis at the forepeak, what appears to be a Royal Yacht Club pennant on the mizzen, and a White Ensign on the jackstaff. Under the bowsprit a full rigged ship can be seen in the distance.

Mirage owned by the Marquis of Ormonde, of the Royal Yacht Squadron. She appears in a supplement to Yachting World no.5, Vol 1, 1894. The image is a Photomezzotype by The London Stereoscopic Co. from a photo by W Kirk of Cowes. Jeff remarks that it is one of the earliest photos in his collection – some of the others are too badly foxed or undated. Note two other sailing yachts moored behind.

Erin as she was when she set out to cross the Atlantic. The image is a Photomezzotype from the Yachting World, thinks Jeff. The shot dates from the mid-1890s, but there is no other information. The ‘lights’ are white dots added to the image by hand, as are the letters ‘ERIN’ between the masts.

La Belle Sauvage appears in a supplement to Yachting World, January 1902. The photo is by Beken of Cowes. 1902 was the year of the Coronation Regatta. Note all sails are stowed in covers and the tropical awnings have been rigged.

Sabrina, Thames measurement 513 tons. She appears in a supplement to Yachting World, August 1899. Photo by Kirk of Cowes.

Oimara, 202 tons,  as shown in a supplement to Yachting World, January 1903. Photo by Adamson, Rothesay. Jeff comments that there are canvas screens on the bridge, and that although she is under way she has gangplank rigged. Also notice the figurehead.

Shemara, pictured in a supplement to Yachting World, February 1900. Photo by Debenham, Cowes.

Vanduara, 450 tons, owned by Mr Stewart Clark. The photo comes from a supplement to Yachting World October 1894. It is a badly foxed Photomezzotype, but shows a female figurehead, and, Jeff thinks, a small un-rigged keelboat yacht in davits aft on the staboard side.

Paulina from a supplement to Yachting World published in May 1900. Photo by Kirk & Sons, Cowes.

Nirvana, owned by the Countess de Bearn, shown in a supplement to Yachting World February 1904. Photo by Robertson of  Gourock. Jeff says there is a tricolor on the jackstaff, the figurehead seems a bird, and there is a crewman walking a boom rigged with a rope ladder to the dinghy.

Surf, 489 tons, as shown in a supplement the Yachting World, in November 1899. Photo by Debenham of Cowes.

Tuscarora shown in a supplement to Yachting World, February 1902. Photo Beken of  Cowes. There’s a rope ladder over stern, and boats appear to be being prepared for launching.

The steel screw steamer Titania appeared in a supplement to Yachting World published in  April 1905. She was designed and built by Day, Summers and Co and owned by Mr S. Taylor Chadwick. She was of 138 tons Thames Measurement, and measured 116.5 by 16.1 by 10.1ft. The photo is by Kirk of Cowes.

Researching the fate of these craft, Jeff found that the steam yacht Hiawatha – not pictured in this post – was acquired by the Royal Navy, which renamed her HMS Undine. She served at Sheerness and as flagship to the Commander-in-Chief of the Nore Fleet.

Thanks for the shots and information Jeff!

BBA students build a Yachting World Dayboat

Yachting World Dayboat Yachting World Dayboat

 

Photos by Emma Brice and John Palmer

This Yachting World Dayboat was built by Boat Building Academy student Sean Quail, with the help of Charlie Yetton.

Sean joined the BBA’s long boat building course after deciding to make his hobby of woodwork into a career, and went to Lyme after completing his A Level exams – though first he took time out to travel through Australia, Canada and Thailand.

Charlie completed a foundation course at Chelsea College of Art and Design and a BA in fine art sculpture at the University of Brighton, and then worked as an artist’s assistant for a period. He then decided he needed what he called ‘real’ skills – and chose boat building and carpentry as the area in which he was most interested.

The Yachting Day Boat was originally designed in 1949 by G O’Brien Kennedy; Sean’s was constructed using oak ribs, spruce planks and mahogany-veneered plywood.

This is the second YW Dayboat to be built at the academy – see Locky McKenzie’s build, click here. On Sean’s boat, the plank lines were tweaked a little, and the Highfield
lever
was left off the forestay in favour of tensioning the rig using the jib halyard.

To view Sean’s weblog of the Dayboat build click here.

I gather Sean is now living and working in Hampshire.

PS – If you’re interested in what the BBA can teach and might consider one of its short courses, take a look at its 2012 short course programme.

Boat Building Academy summer 2010 student launch

[ad#intheboatshed-post]

Youngest student on the course Alasdair Grant (18 years) launching his Beer Beach Boat

(L-R) Tim Price and Tom Trevessey and boat owner Lachlan McKenzie in the background - bringing 14’ ‘Tailwind’ Yachting World Day Boat to the harbour Foreground – Dominic Frankis in his 12’5” Mallard Dinghy, with James Downs in the background celebrating with champagne in his 14’ 3” Canadian Canoe Martin McMahon’s 16’5” Islay Skiff with student Jim Walsh and BBA Graduate and woman gig-builder Gail McGarva in waders

18 year-old Alasdair Grant launching his Beer beach boat; Tim Price, and Tom Trevessey and  Lachlan McKenzie bringing Yachting World Dayboat Tailwind to the harbour; Dominic Frankis sails his Mallard dinghy while James Downs in the background celebrates  in his Canadian canoe; Martin McMahon, Jim Walsh and BBA graduate and woman gig-builder Gail McGarva in waders with Martin’s Islay skiff

Back in early June June 2010 six full-sized boats built by students at the Boat Building Academy workshops were  launched at  Lyme Regis.

If that seems a long time ago,  I apologise – I should explain that as a one-man band and I’ve had rather a lot to keep me busy lately!

The full-sized boats were joined by as surprise additional contender – a remote-controlled model of a Nordic Folkboat built in student Tim Price’s spare time.

Among the boats launched were a 14ft Yachting World Day Boat, a 12ft 5in Mallard sailing dinghy, a 16ft 5in Beer beach boat and a 14ft skiff with a polyester and glass hull, and a wooden fit-out. The sun shone, as usual – I really don’t know how the BBA does it.

Among the students were a management consultant, a builder, a product designer, an architectural technologist, a snowboarding instructor and a handful of school and university leavers.

The selection photos above come from BBA staffer Emma Brice, who has promised more of the individual boats over the next weeks. Thanks Emma!