Tag Archives: ship

How to make a ship in a bottle

Model of the barque Penang in a dimple whisky bottle

How to make a ship in a bottle, Clive Monk’s way. Making a model ship in a whisky bottle might be just the thing for these chilly wintry spring evenings when there’s now some light but nobody wants to go out.

The dimple bottle takes me back – when I was young I remember I had a yachting great uncle based in Ayr who was a director of Haig.

Sitting by the stove drinking whisky is nice, but surely spring and summer will come soon? Please?

1885 ship’s signalling lamp made by Bulpitt’s of Birmingham

Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885

Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885 Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885 Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885

This splendid example of Victorian engineering is a ship’s signalling lamp made by Bulpitt & Sons in 1885, and restored in the last few weeks by John Armstrong, who trades as Boat Antiques.

I guess the lamp would have been used for Morse code, which would explain the cute switch on the side.

As usual, click on the images to see much larger photos.

Here’s what John has to say about it:

‘This Bulpitt & Sons signal lamp arrived in to our workshop in December.

‘The company was founded by Thomas Bulpitt in 1868 and was originally based at Northwood Street, Birmingham. Initially a brass founders, the company prospered and went on to specialise in lamps and kettles. Early in the 20th century it launched the brand name ‘Swan‘, which is still trading today.

The lamp arrived in a fairly sorry state of repair, but the fact that it was still here at all was a testament to the craftsmanship of her makers. The first job was to give her a really good clean out and rub down. Years of rust had left the surface terribly pitted, to sand out all of these craters would have meant severely weakening the structure, and as we had high hopes of her returning to full working service, this was not going to be an option. Instead once the initial debris and corrosion was removed we protected the metalwork with multiple layers of enamel, rubbing down between coats achieve an even finish. It was slow progress, and the lamp still has the odd battle wound that tells of its neglect in the past, but I’m sure you will agree that overall the difference is remarkable and hopefully the shiny new paint work will go some way to preserving her for the next hundred years.

‘Once the exterior was sorted it was time to turn our attentions to the mechanism and the lamp itself. Amazingly the lamp still had a wick and oil in it when it arrived, it even managed a small flame (for a while). All the workings were cleaned out and the old wick and oil removed. Although much less affected by the corrosion than the exterior, there was still some superficial rust and evidence of well worn paint, so the screen, stage, lamp and rest all got a brush up.

‘Last but not least the brass work. A lot of spit and polish together with a good measure of elbow grease, not to mention some Brasso, soon had her gleaming again. And what a sight she is now. This was clearly an expensive item in its day, all the signs are there from quality of the lens to the small bone handle that operates the shutter. The mechanics are beautifully simple and meticulously crafted, easily dismantling for inspection and cleaning. It truly is a joyous thing to handle and I am sorely tempted to keep it for myself but, alas, it appears in our shop even as I type and given its rarity is hardly likely to stay there for long.’

Signalling lamp before restoration:

Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885 Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885

Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885 Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885 Ship's signalling lamp made by Thomas Bulpitt 1885

PS – Visitors to the Boat Antiques website should check out the  gorgeous Tumlaren restoration job on the company’s restoration page. We do like a Tumlaren, we do…

The mysteries of flag etiquette explained

Do you ever feel second-bested because you don’t understand the rules about flags where they apply to boats and yachts? Do you perhaps feel that its just another way that the world has found of finding fault, and judging you to be wrong in yet another way? Do you think that it’s an area that exists purely for the entertainment of certain fastidious personality types that can safely be ignored? Is it just quaint and fun? Or is it important – so important that others who get it wrong MUST BE TOLD FIRMLY and should SEE DEMONSTRATIONS IMMEDIATELY?

I guess all four points of view may apply at times, though for me the first three come more naturally to an egalitarian, liberal kind of mind, and the last can be either fun or just tiresome, depending.

For the benefit of those who don’t really ‘get’ flags but like to fly the Red Ensign every now and again, here is an explanation of what you’re supposed to know so that you need never again feel at a loss. And it comes complete with a nice story or two…

   

   

  

Clipper ship trade cards on the wonderful Howtobearetronaut.com website

The Celebrated A1 Extreme Clipper Ship Kingfisher The Popular First Class Clipper Ship Lookout

Howtobearetronaut.com has many, many fabulous images, though not too many seem to be of boats and ships. However, I particularly like these trade cards and also these from the clipper ship era, and these images of Venice in the 1890s.

YouTube video of ship building in Faversham Creek

Patrick Hay has written to drawn attention to a fabulous YouTube video about the history of Faversham Creek including some splendid footage of the famous sideways launch and some authentic voices. It’s a great way to spend 11 minutes, particularly if you know the area.

Tait’s Seamanship manual on how to sail a ship, part V

Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 85c

Here’s another instalment of the seamanship manual published around a century ago by James Tait, Extra Master and teacher of navigation. For earlier instalments, click here.

Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 83 Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 85a Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 85b

Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 85c Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 85d Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 87

Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 89 Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 91 Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 93

Tait's Seamanship or how to sail a ship page 95

Tait’s Seamanship, or how to sail a ship, part IV

Tait's Seamanship page 57

‘Masters and crews of stranded vessels should bear in mind that success in landing them in great measure depends upon their coolness, and attention to the rules here laid down, and that by attending to them many lives are annually saved by the Rocket Apparatus on the coasts of the United Kingdom.’

Here’s another instalment of the seamanship manual published around a century ago by James Tait, Extra Master and teacher of navigation. For earlier instalments, click here.

Tait's Seamanship page 57 Tait's Seamanship page 59 Tait's Seamanship page 61

Tait's Seamanship page 63 Tait's Seamanship page 65 Tait's Seamanship page 67

Tait's Seamanship page 69 Tait's Seamanship page 71 Tait's Seamanship page 73

Tait's Seamanship page 75 Tait's Seamanship page 77 Tait's Seamanship page 79

Tait's Seamanship page 81