Tag Archives: royal navy

1917 distance control boat restoration under way at Avonmouth

There are restorations – and then there are restorations so challenging and rarified that the very thought of them makes my teeth rattle and the fluid surrounding my brain boil. this is one of those…

Here’s what my correspondent Helen Aldom has to say about it…

‘One of 12 40ft fast torpedo boats built in 1917, CMB9 was discovered by marine surveyor [and my correspondent’s brother] Robert Morley, who found her lying in a boatyard where she had been neglected for 40 years and was due to be broken up.

‘A crude attempt had been made at some stage to convert her into a cabin cruiser.

‘It is remarkable that she survived so long in those circumstances, and fortunate that Mr Morley was able to recoginise the hull shape straight away having worked on the restoration of a 55ft torpedo boat of the same era.

‘He had the boat transported to his yard at Avonnmouth, and while he feared she could break her back in the process, the boat had been so well made by the original builders, Thorneycroft, that she didnt even creak or groan.

‘This strength is partly due to the remarkable number of ribs placed close together.

‘She has a stepped hydroplane hull and is of double diagonal mahogany construction. Boats of this type were capable of 40 knots propelled by a single screw, and carried one 18 inch torpedo.

‘At present power is provided by two Leyland 400 diesels dating back to the 50s.  Subsequent research has confirmed the identity of the boat. The records show she served with the Navy during WW1 and was based at Osea Island and at the Dover Patrol’s advance base at Dunkirk.

‘What adds to the historical importance of this boat is that in 1918 she was converted into a top-secret distance control boat and designated DCB1. In this role she was fitted with twin screws, bilge keels, radio masts and a small bridge with wireless controls – unfortunately, details of the tests remain classified.

‘She is the only surviving example of this type of boat. The unusual square super-structure that CMB9/DCB1 now has was added with the purpose of protecting the radio control equipment.

‘During the war she saw action at Zeebrugge and escaped unharmed from a German torpedo attack – CMB1 took a direct hit and blew up.

‘She is now registered with National Historic Ships and recently received an award from the Transport Trust.

‘Mr Morley hopes to get her back on water by next year in order to take part in events marking the centenary of the outbreak of World War I.’

The National Historic Ships page describing the vessel explains that distance control boats were under radio control from an aircraft some distance away – the vessels’ speed made them difficult targets to hit. The single torpedo was fired from the stern.

I don’t have access to classified records, but I’d suggest that DCBs would be unmanned and that they would have to be regarded as a kind of early drone.

DCB1 remained in service with the Royal Navy until the early 1950s and it is believed that it is the only surviving boat of its type. It would be interesting to know what role the boats may have played during World War II.

There is a Facebook page showing the restoration and recording interesting facts – see and ‘like’ it here.

Thanks Helen!

The sinking of HMS Implacable in 1949

This film of the destruction of HMS Implacable is extraordinary. Almost unbelievably, this vessel was originally a French naval ship that fought at the battle of Trafalgar, and was later captured at the battle of Cape Ortegal.

According to the Wikipedia account, in British service she was involved in capturing the Imperial Russian Navy 74-gun ship Vsevolod in 1808 during the Anglo-Russian War.

Later, Implacable became a training ship and for a time was the second oldest ship in the Royal Navy after Lord Nelson’s flagship at Trafalgar, HMS Victory. It seems unthinkable that a ship in today’s Navy could stay in service for so long.

As the film shows, she flew both the French tricolour as well as the White Duster on the day she was scuttled by the Navy.

Steam pinnace 199 open day at Gosport, 2nd February

Pinnace 199

The Steam pinnace 199 project is holding an open day this Saturday at the Maritime Workshop, Gosport, Hampshire, from 10am to 3pm – she’s been undergoing a refit at the workshop since February 2012.

Built in 1911, Steam pinnace 199 is a wooden-hulled picket boat powered by steam machinery and is the sole operational survivor out of 634 vessels of her type. Picket boats were essential to the effective operation of the Royal Navy: their role was to defend capital ships while anchored.

Steam pinnace 199 is thought to have served alongside HMS Monarch at Jutland during the First World War, and is operated and maintained for her owners, the National Museum of the Royal Navy.

Throughout Saturday there will be opportunities to learn about her history as well as to talk with volunteers who have undertaken over 3,000 hours of work so far.

The current group of volunteers were recently awarded a highly commended certificate  for their preservation work by National Historic Ships.

Entry is free, but I’m sure donations large and small will be very welcome!

To date the volunteers have raised £86,500 of the £97,500 required for the restoration project, including a £50,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund, £30,000 from the Friends of the National Museum of the Royal Navy and £1,000 from National Historic Ships.

Directions: approach via Forton Road and Mill Lane. Take the third right turn into St Vincent College grounds and proceed down to the end where there is a parking area next to some moorings. Note that the workshop’s official address is 50 Ferrol Road but this through the old shipyard entrance and access is very restricted unless you are on foot.