Tag Archives: restoration

Restored Falmouth Quay punt Teal is sailing again!

Don’t you wish she was yours? Adrian Nowotynski has written to report on the progress of the century-old Falmouth Quay punt Teal, which is now back in the water and sailing again following her restoration of the boat at Hegarty’s Boatyard near Cork.

The fabulous photos were taken by Tim Cooke, who writes the weblog An Ilur in Ireland, and are used here with his permission.

Here’s what Adrian has to say:

‘She was relaunched a few weeks ago with great success. We made it to Baltimore two days before the annual Wooden Boat Festival.

‘We had our first attempt of sailing her during the harbour race on Saturday in over 20 knots of wind. It was fantastic and we were very impressed by her.

‘On Sunday we had lighter wind, competed in the race and took part in the parade of sail, this time under full sail minus the topsail ( need more rope for that one).

‘On Monday we sailed her to her home port of Union Hall where she is now sitting on her mooring ready for adventure.

‘The project has been huge, but a fantastic experience that I am missing already, and Teal is absolute gem.

‘Thank you for posting the updates and I will be in touch if we succeed in any big adventures,

‘I will be getting started with the Apple Pie dinghy soon so will let you know.’

Adrian also adds that she will soon be getting a nice new set of sails.

Read Adrian’s weblog for more about Teal.

Restored 1841 whaler Charles W Morgan makes her first trip in over 70 years

Maine-built 1841 whaling ship Charles W Morgan has been towed down river from Mystic Seaport, where she has been kept since 1941, to New London. Read all about her story and find many more photos here.

Happily over the last five years she has been restored at Mystic’s Henry B. du Pont Preservation Shipyard.

At New London she will be ballasted and tested for stability, and her sails will be bent. The photo above shows her crew throwing heaving lines as the ship tied up – the davits all round her will shortly bear her magnificent new whaleboats.

She’s about to set out on her 38th voyage, which will take place this summer in company of two tugs provided by Tisbury Towing of Martha’s Vineyard and the Seaport Museum’s eastern-rigged dragger Roann.

I saw the Charles W Morgan at Mystic many years ago and wondered what her future might be. This seems like a great result – and makes me wonder how it would be if we in the UK got around to building a new clipper. Now wouldn’t that be something…

PS – And how about a string of new small workshops and yards around our coast building and maintaining boat types local to their areas using traditional methods, teaching people to sail them and training youngsters while they are at it? The Faversham Creek Trust seems to me to be an excellent example of what could be done much more widely, and they’re not the only ones. Think of Rescue Wooden Boats… In the past with only a few teaching establishments, they haven’t always had that local focus.

It may be controversial to say so, but I do feel that – sailing barges aside – sailing the larger traditional boats is only open to folks who can afford to keep them and the friends they invite to help sail them – it seems like a closed kind of club, and in the long term I worry that situation will not help in keeping the boats going…

Widely admired Norfolk wherry yacht Hathor relaunched

Norfolk wherry yacht Hathor was relaunched this week following her hull restoration and is now to undergo work on her interior and everything outside from her sheeline upwards, including her stunning Egyptian-themed inlaid woodwork.

These photos are by John Parker (see the news and photogallery here) and appear here with Wherry Yacht Charter’s permission.

For some photos of her interior that I took a few years ago, click here. For some that Ian Ruston took of her under sail, click here. The locals would say the word you’re looking for to describe that sail is ‘hooj’.

Can we save UK’s oldest fishing vessel, celebrate the unique Fal Oyster and help recruit youth into a traditional sailing fleet?

Can we save UK’s Oldest Fishing Vessel, celebrate the unique Fal Oyster and help recruit youth into a traditional sailing fleet. from Fal Oyster on Vimeo.

I’m not sure about the claim that Shadow is the oldest fishing boat in Britain (see Boadicea, Emma and another local star Vivid), but that doesn’t change the story in a way that matters a jot in the grand scheme of things – those Fal folks have a good idea and I hope they succeed.

Twinkle 12 sailing dinghy

A reader I know only as Paul has got in touch to tell us about his sweet little Twinkle 12 clinker built dinghy made largely from from the late 1950s. The twinkling varnish seems to make the name so appropriate…

Here’s what he says:

‘Wrights of Ipswich produced the Twinkle for several years in the 1950s and early 60s. They sail very well if looked after and well rigged, and can be quite exciting in strong winds…

‘Not many are now left and I am thinking of setting up an association to keep track of those that are left.

‘Apart from four new timbers cracked by the previous owner’s trailer she is totally original down to the deck fittings. Lots of work over the winter months but great fun.’

‘Thanks for your great website, with best wishes.’

If anyone’s interested in Paul’s proposed association, please email me at gmatkin@gmail.com and I’ll forward your message to him.

Row St Kilda to Skye – 100 miles of very hard work

Row St Kilda to Skye

These folks’ project is to row the 100 mile distance from St Kilda – a remote island that was abandoned in 1930 – to the Isle of Skye in a boat that was built in around 1890, and which hasn’t been used since 1913.

The legend says that on that occasion a visiting lady had missed the scheduled steamer, and the boat was used to row her to meet the same steamer at a later stop at Stromeferry – and ever since that day, it has hung in the rafters of a boathouse.

Before she makes her first big outing for more than a century, however, she is being restored to her former glory.

The trip itself will be very weather-dependant: it will need a big high to calm the Atlantic seas to make it possible to row to Portree via the sound of Harris, around the top of Rhuba Hunish, down the sound of Raasay, past the Black Rock and into Portree harbour. There will be four crew members rowing at any time, each with one wooden hollow sculled oar and a fixed wooden seat, and a coxswain whose jobs will be keeping time, navigating, and bailing – out water! Another four rowers will be on a support vessel, and the two teams will change over at intervals.

The group is training – it has no previous rowing experience – and expects to be rowing for anything between 38 and 48 hours. Apparently, they expect blisters, back pain, sleep deprivation, exhaustion and a certain amount of chafing from the wooden seats… I guess long-distance rowers with some experience might well be able to offer them some useful advice.

There’s a charity dimension to the project also; money raised is to go to the RNLI and Skye & Lochalsh Young Carers.

Read all about Row St Kilda to Skye here.

PS Canoe and lute builder, Phil Bolger boat builder and astronomer and Bill Samson suggests has pointed out that some time ago the BBC Alba screened a TV programme about two women from the Stornoway Canoe Club on the Isle of Lewis, Dolina Swanson and Christine Stewart, recreating a 1965 canoe journey by Hamish and Anne Gow.

The Gows became the first kayakers to make the treacherous 40-plus mile sea journey from the Western Isles to the mystical islands of St Kilda.

Lewis boat builder Angus Smith re-create the original plywood and canvas Clyde double kayak – for the trip… See the BBC’s page of information, a clip and photos here. Thanks Bill!

Sailing barge Westmoreland returns to Lower Halstow – and needs funds

Westmoreland returns to Lower Halstow

This may not look like much to most folks – but it shows the brickie barge Westmoreland returning to Lower Halstow a few days ago.

The next step in bringing her back to life is to put in a bid for a Heritage Lottery grant – but in the meantime the trust looking after her could do with some donations to help pay for towing her to her new berth, and the insurance the job required.

Built in 1900 in Conyer (just a few creeks away off the Swale), the sailing barge worked from Lower Halstow for 60 years, taking bricks up to London. She’s also Kent’s last brickie barge – generally small barges these were built specifically for the job.

The aim of the Westmoreland Trust Community Interest Company is to restore the barge and to use her to tell the story of the brickfields and barges that carried the bricks used to build London.

Read more about the SB Westmoreland here and here.