Tag Archives: restoration

Henry Blogg’s boat arrives at the Museum of the Broads for restoration

The hoveller fishing boat used by Cromer’s legendary lifeboat coxswain Henry Blogg this week arrived at Stalham for restoration by volunteers working with the Museum of the Broads, Stalham.

Old Henry was heavily decorated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, and like all RNLI lifeboatman was a volunteer – he made his living catching the famous Cromer crabs.

The hoveller fishing boat differs from other fishing boats as it had a small deck at the bows enabling the fishermen to carry a small stove to boil water and make tea – which is of course essential for any boat belonging to Englishman, particularly if they’re working on the cold North Sea.

The boat is named the QJ&JQueenie, Jack and Jim – and was named after Henry’s family members.

There have been a number of attempts over the years to save the historically important boat made from ash, larch and oak. Sadly, by the time it reached the museum, the stern was too bad to restore.

The plan is to restore the bow and return her to her Cromer home for exhibition next year.

Westmoreland Trust publishes North Kent brickmaking booklet online

Bricks Brickmen & Barges

Bricks Brickmen & Barges tells the story the brick-making industry of the Faversham, Conyer and Lower Halstow area of North Kent, and of how barges carried the bricks up-river, where they were used to build Victorian London.

It is published by the Westmoreland Trust, which aims to restore the last remaining Kent brick barge, Thames sailing barge Westmoreland, as a training vessel and working exhibit of the age when the brickfields and barges of North Kent ranked alongside Chatham Dockyard as the leading local employer.

In particular the Trust focuses on Westmoreland’s links with Lower Halstow – for her entire working life she was owned and operated by Eastwoods Brickmakers, which had works in the village.

For more information, see the Westmoreland Trust website.

Restored Falmouth Quay punt Teal is sailing again!

Don’t you wish she was yours? Adrian Nowotynski has written to report on the progress of the century-old Falmouth Quay punt Teal, which is now back in the water and sailing again following her restoration of the boat at Hegarty’s Boatyard near Cork.

The fabulous photos were taken by Tim Cooke, who writes the weblog An Ilur in Ireland, and are used here with his permission.

Here’s what Adrian has to say:

‘She was relaunched a few weeks ago with great success. We made it to Baltimore two days before the annual Wooden Boat Festival.

‘We had our first attempt of sailing her during the harbour race on Saturday in over 20 knots of wind. It was fantastic and we were very impressed by her.

‘On Sunday we had lighter wind, competed in the race and took part in the parade of sail, this time under full sail minus the topsail ( need more rope for that one).

‘On Monday we sailed her to her home port of Union Hall where she is now sitting on her mooring ready for adventure.

‘The project has been huge, but a fantastic experience that I am missing already, and Teal is absolute gem.

‘Thank you for posting the updates and I will be in touch if we succeed in any big adventures,

‘I will be getting started with the Apple Pie dinghy soon so will let you know.’

Adrian also adds that she will soon be getting a nice new set of sails.

Read Adrian’s weblog for more about Teal.