Tag Archives: Peggy

Peggy the coble

There’s something wonderful and graceful about the coble Peggy. There are some boats I could look at for hours, and she’s one of them…

From the NE Maritime Trust website, I learn Peggy was built at Amble in 1924, and was sold first to Beadnell, then Seahouses. Later she moved to Amble and Hartlepool, from where she was bought by an NEMT member.

Now she has been extensively restored with a lot of the work being done at South Shields by Fred Crowell. Fabulous stuff…

Gentleman’s yacht The Peggy comes out of her cellar after 200 years

The Peggy, built in 1789 for politician and banker George Quayle (1751–1835) one of a tiny number of vessels built in the 18th century that still survive, has been moved from the cellar boathouse in which she has lain for more than 200 years. There’s another video of the event here.

My thanks to Chris Brady for spotting this one.

The clinker-built ‘armed yacht’ was schooner rigged with a bowsprit and had six oar-holes, and also sported six cannons and two stern chasers. She’s also the oldest surviving example of a sailing vessel with sliding keels, which are said to be the ancestor of the daggerboard.

Read about the Peggy here, and here.

The Peggy’s move is for the purposes conservation and study.

Other work completed by the  Isle of Man Nautical Museum includes and archaeological excavation of her 18th century owner’s 18th dock. See a time-lapse video of the dig: