Tag Archives: Norfolk Broads

Navigators & General Three Rivers Race, 2015

Navigators & General Three Rivers Race 2015 from Skyhover Aerial Video Norfolk on Vimeo.

My thanks to Paul Mullings for this one!

Excellent archive Broadland Memories needs help

Broadland Memories

The wonderful Broadland Memories online archive of images and personal memories of life and leisure on the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads is in trouble and needs help – as sometimes happens with websites that depend on one or two people for their existence.

Through photos, historical bits and pieces and memories, it provides a fascinating picture of the social history of the Norfolk Broads from the start of the holiday boom when the railways brought Victorian holidaymakers and day trippers to the region in the late 19th century, through the birth of the boat hire industry and the introduction of motor cruisers in the early part of the 20th century, and the post-World War II boating boom. And I think it’s great.

However, when websites depend on one person, they depend also on their personal circumstances and their health – both of which are necessarily changeable and vulnerable over time. And now Broadland Memories needs help because its webmistress is no longer able to fund the website on her own. What’s more, its software is outdated, doesn’t work well on smartphones and tablets, and is still maintained using a computer running Windows XP.

If you enjoy Broadland Memories and can help, use the PayPal link on the website, or get in touch – aw well as allowing appropriate pgrades to be put in place, it will also help in acquiring historic photographs, films and ephemera for the archive.

Creeksailor films The Norfolk Broads

Dawn on the River Ant

The Dilham Canal – see Creeksailor Tony Smith’s weblog

I remember going up the Dilham canal in my kids’ little Mouseboat years ago – it’s well worth the trip to find a lost part of The Norfolk Broads.

And while I’m at it… photographer Lord Paul is the man who is everywhere on The Broads. If you don’t already known the network of rivers, staithes, lakes and peat workings, his collection of YouTube videos certainly provide a taste of what you’ll find.