Tag Archives: National Historic Ships

Humber keel Daybreak made flagship of the year

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Humber keel Daybreak has been made national flagship for the year by National Historic Ships UK.

The award goes to the owners of the vessel with the most impressive seasonal programme of public events in the forthcoming year and is designed to increase the public’s appreciation of historic vessels in the UK’s heritage.

The winning vessel receives a broad pennant to fly from its masthead wherever it goes, and a grant of £1000 towards the cost of keeping the vessel in operational condition and opening her for public viewing.

Daybreak is a 61-ft keel built by Richard Dunston of Thorne and launched­­ in 1934, which makes her one of the last keels built. She was owned by Hanleys, a firm of Doncaster flour millers.

Motorised in the 1940s, she was restored to sail in 1986, and has been based on the River Thames for the last 38 years.

Daybreak’s has an extensive public programme for this year including festivals, barge matches, open days along the East Coast and a reconstructed trading voyage under sail from Hull to Doncaster.

Daybreak is on the National Register of Historic Vessels (NRHV) held by National Historic Ships UK.

The Scottish Fisheries Museum Boat Club’s extensive programme for the herring drifter Reaper from Anstruther to the Yorkshire coast caught the judges’ eye, and the organisation has been awarded runner-up, with a grant of £250.

National Historic Ships annual photographic competition 2014

Once again, National Historic Ships UK is running its annual photography competition for this year, and offering a range of equipment and cash prizes to be won.

There are categories for all ages, including one for young photographers under 18.

Entries must be in by the 31 August – the collection above represent some of the judges’ favourites submitted so far this month.

To enter in any of the competition categories, fill in an online entry form and upload your images to the National Historic Ships UK competition webpage at www.nationalhistoricships.org.uk.

There are rules and so on to check on the site also, as well as a handy web gizmo to enable photographers to identify historic ships that local to them and which might provide suitable subjects. (I think non-photographers will find that interesting too!)

Still more, the site has a set of tips for photographers working with marine topics – and one of them says that you deon’t have to have a special camera and that you’re more likely to have a small camera with you when the moment arises. So I guess my little Panasonic will do.

By the way, I’m not a judge but I’m going off the very processed multi-exposure shots we’ve seen so often in recent years, and – bravo! – I’m delighted to see that the judges’ favourites submitted so far during April don’t fall into that category.

PS – The Marsh Awards for volunteers - National Historic Ships is also calling for nominations of volunteers for the Marsh awards, which recognise those who have made a significant contribution to the conservation or operation of historic vessels in the UK.

There is an overall prize of £1,000 to be won for the Marsh Volunteer Award, and £500 for the young volunteer of the year, which is available to nominees aged 25 or under. Both prizes are donated by the Marsh Christian Trust.

Both awards will be presented at our National Historic Ships UK Awards Ceremony, being held in October on HQS Wellington.

Last year’s winners included James Dulson and George Collinson, who have volunteered for a number of years at the Merseyside Maritime Museum, Liverpool, helping to conserve historic vessels including Edmund Gardner, and Isabelle Law who has volunteered as crew on the ferry Glenachulish for the past five years despite having only recently turned 16 years old.

The closing date for nomination is 31 August. Read what to do and about the Marsh awards here.

 

Shortlisted photos for the annual National Historic Ships photographic competition

As usual at this time of year National Historic Ships has put the shortlisted images for its annual competition online – and as you’d expect they are a delight. If you’re like us and really enjoy a good photo, I’d say you should get over to the competition web pages as soon as you can.

The organisation has also published these tips on how to photograph boats – and I rather like their point about small cameras being more likely to be handy when you need them. I really like my little Panasonic TZ30, and the Samsung WB600 that went before got a lot of use too.

To their list, I’d add that I find taking shots a little after dawn or before before sunset seems to flatter a boat, and that while Beken (who supplied some of the tips) say we shouldn’t use a zoom, I don’t know what I’d do without mine.

So, like all these things, what they say is worth serious consideration but probably isn’t the whole answer. But on the other side of the argument, I knew how to take seriously good shots of boats, I’d be doing something else for a living, or I’d enter the competition myself!

National Historic Ships will announce the winners during October. Myself, I think they’re nearly all potential winners – but as I say, I’m a fool for a good photo!