Tag Archives: lifeboat

Building the Colin Archer Emma

There’s plenty to read and pictures to see at the Emma website – but as it’s in Dutch, I suspect many Intheboatshed.net readers won’t understand it too readily. If Nederlands isn’t your favourite language, happily all is not entirely lost – it’s possible to make sense of quite a lot of it using Google Translate and I gather an English version of the site is in the works.

However, there is no Google app that can help you get over the urge to acquire a similar vessel from somewhere and go sailing forever…

The Wikipedia has quite a lot more information about Colin Archer (1832–1921), shipbuilder and designer of more than 200 boats including the design used for building the Emma.

Archer was famous for his durable and safe vessels, and his output included a distinctive double-ended design for the Norwegian Lifeboat institution.

The class of boat remained in service for many years, and some original boats and later builds have been adapted for use as cruising yachts – Emma is an example of a recent build by Tom Pollman from Holland, and is based on drawings of lifeboat RS22, Vardo.

556px-Colin_Archer_Statue

Colin Archer monument erected in his home town of Larvik, photo by Stig Andersen from Wikimedia Commons

Psssst… wanna apprenticeship job in boatbuilding?

 

Restoration projects by Abingdon & Skabardis

Kyle Abingdon of Abingdon & Skabardis Marine Carpentry  has been in touch to say that he is looking for a part-time apprentice to work at his company’s workshops at Dargate near Favershhsam.

No knowledge or experience is required, but a driving licence and transport would be useful.

Kyle adds that the yard has lots of work at the moment including building four Oxford punts and restoring an ex-RNLI Oakley class lifeboat. CVs should be sent to Kyle at info@marinecarpentry.co.uk.

Cromer Lifeboat crew stepdancing in the 1970s

This YouTube gem shows the Cromer Lifeboat crew stepdancing to a melodeon in the 1970s.

It’s a shame enthusiasts for old and traditional boats tend to ignore the cultural stuff – the songs, stories and dancing – that goes along with sailing and fishing.

But they’re obviously important, and step dancing is in some ways especially precious because it’s so unrecorded. For generations it was ignored by folklorists and historians because it was so very common in the pubs of East Anglia and the south-eastern corner of England and along the South Coast . And then in many places it rapidly disappeared, along with the last generation that practised it.

But all is not lost. Step dancing never quite died out in East Anglia and is now experiencing quite a revival with competitions and exhibitions, as well as spontaneous stepping in pubs. In Kent and Sussex also, families and enthusiasts are keeping the tradition alive, and working to bring it back into the public realm.

My thanks to ace melodeon player Katie Howson of the East Anglian Traditional Music Trust for spotting this one.

Colin Archer RS14 roars through rough sea

If you’ve ever wondered what a superbly bouyant  Colin Archer looks like when sailing in the weather for which it was designed, now’s your chance to see one on YouTube. It’s bloody marvellous!

My thanks to Jim Van Den Bos for pointing it out.

1863 lifeboat for sale on eBay – and two other lovely old ladies in need of rescue!

Lifeboat conversion Friend of all Nations for sale on eBay

Fowey boat builder Marcus Lewis has suggested I draw readers’ attention to the fact that the 1863-built lifeboat Friend of All Nations is currently for sale on eBay. I gather she was converted to make a gentleman’s yacht in the 1920s.

It’s an interesting story, as I’ve noticed her half sunk in the past and wondered what she might be. For a photo I took a couple of years ago, click here. She’s an historic piece – there’s a newspaper report of a tragic rescue in which she was involved here.

She’s 43ft in length, 14ft in beam and weighs about 12tons, and I gather she can be floated for transportation purposes. Mark can provide more info on 07826 853149.

Mark also thought readers would like to see some photos he took recently while working at the boatyard at St Winnow on the River Fowey.

Radium Morecambe Bay prawner Radium Morecambe Bay prawner Radium Morecambe Bay prawner

Radium Morecambe Bay prawner

 

The first is he believes a Morecombe Bay prawner named Radium. ‘She has been in Fowey for at least 30 years, probably a lot longer,’ says Marcus. ‘She was kept at the head of Mixtow Creek and was owned by Bill Peacock.

‘She was an ongoing project then, and I was involved in replacing some of the deck planking for him, but the boat was really decaying faster than it was being repaired, but it did float, just!

‘I think when Bill died she was taken up on the beach at St Winnow, and then into the yard. Having gone through a few owners, the yard has now claimed her I think.

Radium’s name is interesting and is engraved on her rudder head, so I guess it’s original – which might put her after 1910? It would be good if someone knew something about her!’

Motor launch Rosemary Motor launch Rosemary

The motor launch Rosemary was built in Polruan after the war for Claude Richards.

‘I think he was a former Humber lifeboat mechanic. Anyway, he ran the evening ferry service from Polruan to Fowey, as well as river trips. His former boat, also Rosemary, had been requisitioned in the war, and when the war was over he asked for it back, but it was in too much of a state – so a new one was built.

‘The boat changed hands several times after Claude retired, but always running pleasure trips up the river Fowey, round the docks and shipping, down to the harbour mouth and back to the quay. Sadly she has been laid up at St Winnow for about 10 years, and probably now past refloating. Who knows how many passengers she carried in her years of service?’

Marcus Lewis is based at Fowey, Cornwall. He can be reached on tel 07973 420568 and via his website at www.woodenboatbuilder.co.uk.

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911 – part III

[ad#intheboatshed-post]

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

Heroes all: the Newquay lifeboat crew on the occasion of a Royal visit in June 1909.

‘A site was chosen in the hollow, a Life-Boat house built, and a concrete slipway constructed in order that the boat might be launched into deep water within easy reach of the open sea and command the whole bay… When required the boat is brought to the edge, and the crew, having donned their oilies and “Kapok” life-belts, climb in and take their places. The masts are stepped, and, at the word of command, she is released, shoots down the slipway and dashes into the sea in a cloud of spray.’

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

lifeboat, newquay, book, lifeboat institution, history

To see the rest of this series:

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911 – part I

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911 – part II

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911 – part III

Also, Ed Bachman has collated these individual pages into two pdf files. Thanks Ed!

The Lifeboat pdf part I

The Lifeboat pdf part II

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911

[ad#intheboatshed-post]

lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history

‘It is impossible to assign to any one person the merit of inventing the Life-Boat’

Based on a 1910 Royal Society of Arts lecture, Sir John Cameron-Lamb’s small book The Life-boat and its Work was published in the following year, and sold for the now-laughable sum of one shilling. I promised the gentlemen who look after Southwold’s historic Alfred Corry I’d scan this book, and so here’s the first instalment!

To see the rest of this series:

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911 – part I

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911 – part II

The Life-boat and its Work, a history from 1911 – part III

lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history

lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history

lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history

lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history

lifeboat, lifeboat institution, john cameron lamb, lukin, wouldhave, tyne lifeboat, greathead, history, lifeboat history