Tag Archives: Lake Rotoiti

Rotoiti 2011 photos by Owen Sinclair

 

Russel Ward's Romany (see steam.co.nz). With a setting like this it would be a crime not to run an event

Russel Ward’s Romany (see steam.co.nz). A lovely boat in a fabulous setting

Reader Owen Sinclair has written in with a short report and some stunning photos from the 2011 New Zealand Antique & Classic Boatshow at Lake Rotoiti. His photos appear on this weblog with his permission. Many  thanks Owen!

Here’s what he says:

‘Hello Gavin,

‘Numbers seemed to be down this year, presumably due to the Christchurch earthquake, and perhaps also due to a forecast for heavy rain. But after heavy rain early in the morning the clouds cleared and the day became brilliantly sunny.

Whaleboat built by Ron Perano Whaleboat built by Ron Perano

‘This whaleboat was built recently by Ron Perano to the lines of a whaleboat built in Tasmania and used for whaling in Cook Strait, and donated to the Canterbury Museum in 1926. I think this was one of the few shore-based whale fisheries in the world. The Perano family was one of several associated with whaling and has many descendants in the area today.

‘Another whaling family was the Guard family, and a Guard was on the whaleboat today. I was offered a row, an entirely new experience. The oars are long, heavy, flexible and pivot between thole pins. Although it was an impromptu crew with half probably aged over 70 the boat moved along really well with six rowers and a man steering with a sweep oar. A wonderful opportunity, greatly enjoyed. Thank you Messrs Perano and Guard.

Russel Ward's Romany (see steam.co.nz). With a setting like this it would be a crime not to run an event

Romany – see owner Russell Ward’s website: steam.co.nz .

Canoe-yawl built to the lines of Eel Canoe-yawl built to the lines of Eel Canoe-yawl built to the lines of Eel

Canoe-yawl built to the lines of Eel, a George Holmes design, by a man from Timaru whose name I unfortunately didn’t get. He has built many boats and it shows.

Hamilton jetboat built about 1973, steam launch, stitch and tape version of Rushton's Wee Lassie, and a lug yawl designed and built by an Australian boatbuilder

Hamilton jetboat built about ’73, steam launch, stitch and tape version of Rushton’s Wee Lassie, and a lug yawl designed and built by an Australian boatbuilder. I think this boat and some detail of the builder was posted recently on Dave Perillo’s website: openboat.co.nz .

Yellow boat is a John Welsford Whaler, built and sailed by Peter Murton.

The yellow boat in this shot is a John Welsford Whaler, built and sailed by Peter Murton.

Wooden trailer Wooden trailer

Trailer built in Oregon pine, otherwise known as Douglas fir. I didn’t see what it carries. Nice work!

Pipedream, built in England Pipedream, built in England

Pipedream, built in England.

‘Regards,

‘Owen Sinclair’

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Summer on Lake Rotoiti

Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - pedal powered catamaran

Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - pedal powered catamaran Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - pedal powered catamaran Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - pedal powered catamaran

Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - homebuilt Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - homebuilt Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - homebuilt

Summer on Lake Rotoiti - photos from Paul Mullings - homebuilt

I reckon Paul Mullings is out to make us winter-bound Northern Europeans envious with these shots taken in high summer down in New Zealand – which he sent in an email in which he signs off  ‘Keep warm – Paul’.

The shots of a pedal powered catamaran and an interesting home-built cruising dinghy were taken on the shores of Lake Rotoiti in the Nelson Lakes National Park at the top of the South Island and show a couple of boats that caught his interest recently. The cat looks fun, but can anyone identify the dinghy and perhaps explain how that tiller works?

We’ve had some of the most bitterly cold weather I’ve seen lately, and the only way to keep consistently warm round here is to never leave the stove. I’m tempted to do just that each morning, though other people I know are busily leaving the country…