Tag Archives: Equipment and boats for sale

Folkboat mast and boom for sale

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Fowey boatbuilder Marcus Lewis has written to let us know about this for sale offer – which I would guess might be a godsend for someone…

‘I am re-rigging my vintage wooden Folkboat over the winter and converting her to a gaff ketch! I will have for sale a Sitka spruce mast and boom, made to order for me just over a year ago, by Collars.

‘It comes fully rigged.

‘I would be prepared to accept either cash or a shorter wooden mast, and gaff. My new rig will feature a loose-footed mainsail. I am 73 and need a less lively set-up as I tend to sail single handed!

‘Regards, Nick Messinger, SY Oakleaf, Portland’

If you’re interested, email me at gmatkin@gmail.com and I’ll pass the message along.

20ft clinker motor launch up for sale

Boatbuilder Nick Smith is selling this 20ft motor launch, Bamboo Viper, which he built for himself in 2004, on eBay.

Nick served a four-year traditional boatbuilding apprenticeship at Edgar Cove Ltd, Salcombe, Devon, 1976 to 1980, and has been building and restoring wooden boats ever since. He says his boats all show a distinctive Salcombe influence.

The boat is in top condition, as he has spent six weeks refurbishing her earlier this year, including taking the engine out. She’s been on his mooring at Christchurch for the last two months, with the cover on, when not in use.

She is fitted with a 15 hp Yanmar 2YM twin diesel inboard, and the price includes a purpose built galvanised and braked road trailer.

Thames Estuary One Design for sale

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Pssst… How about an 18ft Thames Estuary One Design for the summer?

At this time of year, many people will be thinking about what to sail in the coming season – and for someone this could be the ideal boat.

Fiona, fomerly Mercury, was built in Burnham on Crouch in 1936, and is for sale by the International Boatbuilding Training College following a major restoration. The college folks say a few minor touches would be needed to finish her off.

The story goes that in 1911 Southend’s Alexandra Yacht Club asked designers to draw up a one-design boat that would be able to sit on the estuary mud at low tide. Both Morgan Giles and May of Hammersmith submitted plans for an 18ft sailing dinghy with a lifting keel and optional rig of up to 220 sq ft. The Morgan Giles boat was adopted, but with the sail area reduced to 210 sq ft.

A number of members agreed to purchase new boats at a meeting in December 1911. Drake Brothers of Tollesbury won a tender and built ten boats, and the first race took place in May 1912. Read more history here.

More detail about the boat is available at Sailboatdata.com.