Tag Archives: fish

More of Matt Atkin’s Hong Kong photos

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

Matthew Atkin's photos of Hong Kong

My brother Matt Atkin and his family are greatly enjoying living in Hong Kong, and he continues to take many photographs of the island itself and the Far East destinations he visits for work and on holiday.

He’s recently sent me an armful of photos of the boats of Thailand that I’ll put up shortly; in the meantime, here are some recent shots from Hong Kong.

See some earlier posts of Matts photos:

More of Matt Atkin’s photos of the boats and ships of Hong Kong’s harbours
Spectacular photos of working boats and houseboats in Hong Kong’s harbours

The boats of Hanoi, part 2

The boats of Hanoi, Vietnam

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A waterside stroll around Plymouth

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Smeaton’s Tower, Plymouth Hoe. As usual, click on the thumbnails for much larger photos

Today we have one of intheboatshed.net’s waterside strolls – and this time it’s a series of photos taken by my wife Julie Atkin on a recent trip to the old maritime city of Plymouth.

The town shows the scars of having been devastated by a notorious wartime bombing raid in 1941 but still has quite a few old gems of buildings left from earlier times. It also has some striking large and small monuments, many of which are rather touching.

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Cattewater Harbour Commission; the impressive Royal William Victualling Yard built in the 1820s; the wonderful 1935 Tinside tidal swimming pool; and the site where they make the fabulously fragrant Plymouth Gin

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Apart from the smack in the first group of photos there weren’t many interesting old wooden boats around, but she found these  – the one on the left is for sale

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The Sir Francis Drake monument; the Mayflower monument; a list of the Pilgrim Fathers (click on the image to see it at a readable size); Roanoke Colonies; Tolpuddle Martyrs; iron pipes!

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Monuments on the wall of the Royal National Lifeboats Institution shop make loss and survival at sea intensely personal: see how the name Launder comes up several times, and the memorials to the crew of the Pescado, the last of the old time trawler skippers and the last steam trawler skipper. And don’t miss the memorial to the elderly couple whose long lives are attributed to eating a lot of fish


Cooking the traditional way aboard the Light Trow Onawind Blue

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Cooking on board Ben Crawshaw’s Onawind Blue

I don’t know about you, but I find just looking at this photo of Ben’s dinner cooking on board his Light Trow named Onawind Blue sets my senses off. I’m sure I can smell this dish as it cooks.

To quote Ben:

‘According to the great Catalan writer Josep Pla (1897-1981) fish stew as cooked and eaten by fishermen is the most ancient of Mediterranean dishes. Regardless of the religion, the rulers or the nationality of the neighbouring shores fish stew has been a constant.

‘A simple dish with a long history that, marrying fish, onion, garlic, tomato and potato in the pot, produces sustaining, sumptuous yet delicate fare. From this fundamental marriage the Provencal bouillabaisse was born and also the less elaborate suquet of Catalonia, a dish that has attained an almost legendary status (at least on its home shores) and one that usually carries a price tag to match.’

Find out how to cook it – the recipe is simple and you’ll find it at Ben’s excellent weblog The Invisible Workshop.

For more on trows in general and the Light Trow in particular, including boatbuilding plans etc, click here.