Tag Archives: cornwall

Petition – save the tradition of salmon netting on the Tamar and Tavy

Salmon netting petition

We met Tamar salmon netter Alec Friendship this weekend – and learned that there’s a serious danger that riparian fishing rights owners along the river will get their way and end traditional salmon netting by a tiny number of just three or four licensed fishermen on the Tamar and Tavy.

(Alan may be familiar to readers, as he ran a ferry over the Tamar for many years until quite recently.)

Please indicate your support for the salmon netters here.

What’s striking about the netting fishery is that in common with a few other rivers on the Cornish coast, it’s a pulling boat fishery – the fishermen are only permitted to use boats under oars, not motors.

Fly fishing is big money business on these rivers (as Googling for fly fishing quickly reveals), and I gather from Alec that the riparian rights owners have been campaigning to close down salmon netting for 50 years. No doubt the riparian owners have public relations experts, political connections and the rest, but having met and talked with Alec and having learned a few years ago about the life of Alan Jewitt from obituaries,  it seems unlikely that their campaign will have the same advantages.

Alec tells me that there’s a strong chance riparian interests will win following a consultation on the issue that ends in early April, and that the plan is that the remaining salmon netters’ licences will end on their deaths, and they will not be able to pass their licences on – so the matter is urgent!

This is a case of an unequal struggle – on one side business interest on  with money and Sign the petition here: Keep The Tradition  Of Salmon Netting On The Tamar Tavy

PS – Check out this traditional Tamar salmon netting boat built by Stirling & Son a little while ago. Also, there are some great photos of salmon netting to be found on Flickr.

PPS – Another Tamar salmon fishing boat, Old Stan’s boat, is at the NMMC. See a photo here.

2013 Fowey Classics – 30th July to 2nd August

aug 2010 013 williams boats

Fowey Classics is a rally of vintage and modern classic sailing boats ranging typically from 12 feet to 12 tons (or more) representing a diverse range of designers stretching back to 1886.

It takes place the beautiful and historic port of Fowey (50°21´N, 4°38´W) on the south coast of Cornwall between Plymouth and Falmouth.

Anything up to a 100 boats attend from as far afield as America but largely consisting of visitors from along the south coast and the Brittany coast.

The organisers say the event is a particularly friendly annual gathering. It takes place following Plymouth Classics, with many of the participants sailing down the coast from that event to begin Fowey Classics on the the Tuesday morning (30th July this year) and continuing until the Friday (2nd August this year).

The parade of sail on the Thursday lunchtime is said to be a magnificent sight, and this year a cruise liner Silver Cloud will be moored in the lower harbour on the Friday and Gypsy Moth IV is attending and will open for all to see or sail in.

Other events include various parties, barbecues, a race or two, a cruise in company and talks about Gypsy Moth IV and the local Troy keelboat class – the last one is to be given by Intheboatshed.net regular Marcus Lewis.

If you’d like to see the event or take part, more information can be found at the www.foweyclassics.com or telephone Mike Sutherland on 01726833843.

For more intheboatshed.net posts mentioning Fowey, click here.

Troys at Fowey

Troy class keelboat racing at Fowey

Fowey boatbuilder Marcus Lewis has written to say that he’s had Shimmer, T4 of the Troy Class, in the workshop for a bit of attention, including 11 new ribs, rudder refitting, and painting all over – what he calls the usual maintenance stuff.

Shimmer was built in Fowey by AH ‘Archie’ Watty during the winter of 1929/30. She was made for the local squire Colonel Edward Treffry, and was sometimes sailed by his daughter, Elizabeth.

The old photo below shows Shimmer winning the Royal Fowey Yacht Club Regatta race in 1930 with the colonel at the helm. As the results show, Shimmer started her career in fine style.

In 1946, the boat was sold and bought by author Daphne Du Maurier’s husband, Lt Gen Sir FAM Browning, only to be bought back by Elizabeth Treffry around 1953.

Two of the older Troys are now for sale, T6 Ruby and T7 Sapphire, both in good condition, and still competitive boats, but both are to be sold on condition they do not leave Fowey, and that they continue racing. (The Troy fleet now number 28, four of them built by Marcus in recent years.)

There is more information about these boats on Marcus’s website: www.woodenboatbuilder.co.uk

Lt Gen Sir F.A M Browning winning Fowey Yacht Club Regatta in Shimmer, 1930

 

1930 Fowey Yacht Club regatta results Troy 4 Shimmer in Marcus Lewis' workshop Troy 4 Shimmer paint job

Troy 4 Shimmer ready for the water

Old coloured postcards and colour photos of Cornwall

There’s something arresting about these hand-coloured postcards of Cornwall, which I gather are dated around 1895. See many more at How to be a Retronaut.

There’s a nice comparison with another Retronaut set of the area, this time of colour photos taken just a few years later in 1913.

Interior and fittings of Victorian gentleman’s racing cutter Integrity

 

  

  

These photos of the recently launched Victorian gentleman’s racing cutter Integrity designed and built by Stirling & Son of Tavistock in Cornwall are an illustration of how much research and thought has gone into this boat.

As usual, click on the thumbnails for a better view!

Here’s what Will Stirling has to say:

‘The detail of the interior has been taken from photographs of Victorian yachts. The frames of the panelled oak bulkheads are mortice and tenoned together. Loose panels are fitted in a rebate in the frame. The lower panels are fielded, while the upper panels are flat, and a beading or trim is fitted around the edge of each panel to give the bulkhead a three-dimensional feel.

‘The oak has been treated with Van Dyke crystals, a crushed walnut and water mixture that stains the wood and brings out the quarter grain – you might find something similar in old panelled libraries. Once stained, beeswax is rubbed into the oak and then buffed.

‘I have been collecting fittings for some time. I have managed to collect a full set of brass clam lights with switches to suit, the sink is of hammered copper with a brass galley pump. The Blakes Minor heads has a hand-painted ‘bird bath’ basin next to it with a brass soap holder that came from an old ocean liner.

‘In the next few weeks I hope to get some good sailing shots and shall send them over.’

‘Best wishes, Will’

Stirling & Son traditional yacht builders and wooden boat repairers can be contacted via their website or by phone on 01822 614259.

250 year-old birch bark canoe in Cornish barn to be returned to Canada

Enys birch bark canoe sees daylight for the time in decades

The birch bark canoe on location on the Enys Estate A painting by historical artist John Buxton showing similar birch bark canoes as they would have been used over 200 years ago

Enys birch bark canoe sees daylight for the time in decades; the canoe on location on the Enys Estate; painting by historical artist John Buxton depicting similar birch bark canoes as they were 200 years ago

National Maritime Museum Cornwall curators are working to conserve what may be the oldest birch bark canoe in existence, before it is sent back to Canada.

For over 200 years, the canoe has belonged to the Enys family having been brought to Cornwall by Lt John Enys after he fought in the American War of Independence in 1776. It is estimated to be over 250 years old.

‘Lt Enys sailed from Falmouth in a packet ship to join his regiment in Canada to relieve the city of Quebec, which was under siege from the Americans,’ said NMMC boat collections manager Andy Wyke.  ‘He fought many military campaigns and toured the area for his personal interest – discovering this canoe along the way. It’s incredible to think its legacy has been resting in a barn in Cornwall all this time.’

The canoe has been kept near Penryn in an Enys Estate barn for many years but this week it was moved to the NMMC, where it will be conserved, preserved and put on show from late January until it is  repatriated to Canada in September.

The canoe came to light when Enys family descendent Wendy Fowler called the museum to request they look at the canoe lying in the Estate’s barn.

Captain George Hogg NMMC archivist and trustee said ‘When we received the call from the Enys family to identify their canoe in a shed we had no idea of the importance of the find. We knew we had something special, but having worked with the British Museum on the artefacts and the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ontario, we now believe that this is one of the world’s oldest birch bark canoes. This is a unique survival from the 18th century.’

Canadian Canoe Museum researchers hope to identify where the boat may have been built and by which tribe.

PS – Duckworks has an excellent post explaining how birch bark canoes are made.