Tag Archives: classic

Classic Sailing announces a special Tall Ships Race offer for 16-25-year olds

Tall Ships racing with Classic Sailing

Phwoarrr! If you’re 16-25 and can find the reduced price of €1495 from somewhere, this might just be an irresistable opportunity: http://www.classic-sailing.co.uk/log/youth-15-25-bark-europa

Participants will sail in two legs of the Tall Ships Race on the Europa, starting from Lerwick in the Shetlands on the 22nd July, then across the North Sea to Stavanger in Norway, and then to Halmstadt in Sweden.

My thanks to Mike Goodwin for pointing this out!

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1930s Atkin-designed 25-footer for sale in New York State

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This attractive 1934 Billy Atkin-designed 25ft Matthews Sailer is up for sale – and it’s such a sweet boat I have decided to post some photos.

The Sailer described in the sales literature as a Seabird-type cruiser, and I gather she was built to plans that the Atkins lost in a hurricane in 1938. (By the way, I should explain that I’m not related to Billy and his boat designer son John Atkin so far as I know.)

Miss O has a four-cylinder Graymarine engine (I think this may be orginal), lots of nice bronze, including a screen for the companion way and a folding mast for use on the New York State canal system that can be raised or lowerd by one or two people. The owner and his wife haveve enjoyed the boat for several years and even honeymooned aboard – but have now bought something new.

Click here to find the advert (look for the link to ‘Matthews’): http://cayuga-marina.homestead.com/index.html

Click here to see the original sales leaflet: http://camper-boat-sales.homestead.com/matthews.pdf

THIS BOAT IS NO LONGER FOR SALE – HER OWNERS DECIDED TO KEEP HER AFTER ALL. I’M JUST GLAD SHE’S BEING LOOKED AFTER…

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Edwin Schoettle on catboats, Gavin Atkin on what’s wrong with yachts and yachties

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Legendary catboat Silent Maid

Edwin Schoettle’s classic Sailing Craft published in 1928 is a fabulous big old book of nearly 800 pages – so I hope no-one will mind me posting a few of them. And perhaps my post will serve to keep the memory alight.

I’d like to explain why I’ve been thinking about the catboat lately.

I’ve complained for years that many yachties  motor or motor sail for much of the time and I’ve often wondered what the reason might be. Well, I’ve come to think that it isn’t laziness or a dislike of sailing. The reason why they’re reluctant to use their full sailplan is that they’re either sailing alone, or effectively doing so, and don’t want the fag of having to manage sails, winches and sheets as well as steer, navigate and keep a look out.  And because they’re not using their full sail plan their boats are slow without the help of its engine – and that’s why most yachties motor for much of the time.

Looked at another way, it’s because we’re using the wrong rigs.  Instead of the Bermudan sloop with a masthead rig, big foresail, winches and the rest, we could be using rigs that reduce the number of essential control lines to very few – the cat and the cat yawl.

Of course there’s a shortage of cat yawls outside of a few designers offering plans for relatively small boats aimed at the amateur builders, so I’ve been considering the experiences people have had with the catboat.

I’ve no experience with these boats and have no firm opinions to offer, but it’s interesting that Schoettle emerges as such a fan of the catboat. I’m inclined to think a modified form of catboat, perhaps one with the kind of capacious hull that’s long been normal in family cruising boats could be seriously useful to yachtsmen in the era of expensive fuel and growing environmental awareness.

Those who find it difficult to swallow the idea of the Bermudan sloop being replaced by a more old fashioned rig might thinking about the argument in a different way – instead of describing the cat or cat yawl rig of the future as being derived from historical yacht types or workboats, just think of them as big Lasers with heavy keels.

Read more about Silent Maid in a recent post at the weblog 70.8%.

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