Tag Archives: ben

Ben Crawshaw’s latest Youtube video: the Ebro Delta to Cap Salou

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Ben Crawshaw’s series of short videos recording his astonishing trip in Onawind Blue get better and better – if that’s possible.

The latest sees him rowing and sailing up the eastern Spanish coast from the Ebro Delta to Cap Salou in light winds – at times he’s nearly crushed by exhaustion yet at others he’s so jubilant he’s close to flying. Unmissable, moving stuff, I’d say, though encouraging someone else to do the same thing would be just about the last thing I’d do…

For more on Ben, Onawind Blue and trows light and otherwise, click here.

Our first half-million hits

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Thames Barges

Thames barges on the Blackwater – one of the first photos
to appear at intheboatshed.net

It feels a little funny when I think of it, but some time in the next two or three days in the boatshed.net will rack up its first half million hits.

Those with long memories will recall that this weblog began in a very small way at the end of 2006, and benefited early on from the support of various weblogs and online magazines, most notably Chuck Leinweber’s Duckworks Magazine and Tim Shaw’s Chineblog.

Ben Crawshaw’s wonderful The Invisible Workshop followed as did Chris Partridge’s Rowing for Pleasure, and so did a host more I won’t mention just now because if I do this post will become too huge for words.

We’re now all part of a community of interconnecting weblogs and online magazines, and I’m grateful to all of them both for their assistance in helping readers find their way here, and for the entertainment and interest they have given us in our household. If you come to this site and happen to land on this post, therefore, I’d like to suggest you take a little time to explore the sites and weblogs, as well as the rest of the intheboatshed.net blogroll.

But I have another request: please send me pictures and stories that you’d like to share! We’re particularly interested in old boats, traditionally built boats whether old or new, in boats that bear the influences of the past, in the history and culture of boating, in influential individuals and in alternative ways of enjoying boating rooted in the past. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a proud owner or not, or a boat builder or other boat related craftsman, or even if you simply have something interesting to sell. And the occasional story about a boat-related shed doesn’t go amiss either!

Finally, I’d like to pay tribute to my family and wife Julie, who has shown immense understanding and enthusiasm over a long period. I know that I’ve been very lucky to have their support and I hope they feel the result justifies the effort and time that goes into the inthboatshed.net project.

Reach me either at gmatkin@gmail.com or by using the intheboatshed.net contact page, which you can get to using the page tab above the title line.

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Onawind Blue becomes a Costa Brava celebrity

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onawind-blue-1

onawind-blue-2 onawind-blue-3

I can’t resist showing readers these photos of Ben Crawshaw’s Onawind Blue at the centenary celebrations of the term Costa Brava.

They were taken by Spanish boating weblogger Amiga Atlántica, who I gather writes in a mixture of Castillian Spanish, with bits of of Galician. Certainly if you try to use the Babelfish translator on what she writes the results can be quite interesting. Ben, we learn, is some kind of horseradish – try it for yourself.

Spain’s sailing community seems to be taking Ben and his brave little boat to their hearts – though Ben is adamant that it’s OB they admire, not him!

I also rather liked his remark about the event too: ‘I’m knackered and happy and OB’s ego is pumped up like a balloon from all the compliments she’s received.’ Any sailor back from a trip would be delighted to be able to say as much.

As always, Ben’s weblog entries about the event are interesting and amusing. Read them here and here.

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Onawind Blue in fine sailing conditions

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onawind-blue-at-sea-spring-2009

While we’re still scraping bottoms and slapping on the antifouling, down on the coast of Spain our friend Ben Crawshaw is already enjoying some fine sailing conditions in his Light Trow, Onawind Blue. It’s enough to make a chap sigh… in fact, words fail me. Roll on the English summer!

To see his video, click here.

Ella skiff – drawings for making a model of the stitch and glue 12ft skiff

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skiff-model-making-package

Panels for model-making

lines-and-internals

Ella dinghy, lines and internal arrangement

The Ella skiff has made a bit more progress this evening. I’m pleased to say that we’ve now got a pdf file of the drawings needed to make a simple model ready to be downloaded and printed out.

The boat’s become a little simpler than the initial drawing showed. There’s no forward rowing position, for example, because I couldn’t find a way of fitting it into the panels above – and I didn’t want to go beyond three and a half sheets of ply for this boat.

If you’re interested in her, all you need to do to make a model is to take a printout, stick it to a piece of cereal packet, cut out the various panels and make up the model with sticky tape. Here’s one example of how this kind of model can look; here’s a second example made by the excellent Ben Crawshaw; and here’s a third example made by Woody Jones, and complete with little wire figures made to scale.

If anyone out there makes a model of this little boat, I’d be very grateful to see them, and to be able to post them here at intheboatshed.net!

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Cooking the traditional way aboard the Light Trow Onawind Blue

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cooking-aboard-onawind-blue-470

Cooking on board Ben Crawshaw’s Onawind Blue

I don’t know about you, but I find just looking at this photo of Ben’s dinner cooking on board his Light Trow named Onawind Blue sets my senses off. I’m sure I can smell this dish as it cooks.

To quote Ben:

‘According to the great Catalan writer Josep Pla (1897-1981) fish stew as cooked and eaten by fishermen is the most ancient of Mediterranean dishes. Regardless of the religion, the rulers or the nationality of the neighbouring shores fish stew has been a constant.

‘A simple dish with a long history that, marrying fish, onion, garlic, tomato and potato in the pot, produces sustaining, sumptuous yet delicate fare. From this fundamental marriage the Provencal bouillabaisse was born and also the less elaborate suquet of Catalonia, a dish that has attained an almost legendary status (at least on its home shores) and one that usually carries a price tag to match.’

Find out how to cook it – the recipe is simple and you’ll find it at Ben’s excellent weblog The Invisible Workshop.

For more on trows in general and the Light Trow in particular, including boatbuilding plans etc, click here.