Tollesbury Sailing Club revisited

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Tollesbury Sailing Club is no ordinary sailing club. For one thing it has a long history dating back to just after the First World War. For another, it has a membership that owns and maintains some impressive boats, including a range of East Coast smacks. And, finally, it has an enterprising webmaster who, as we’ve seen, has put up some extremely useful material on knot tying, sailing in the area, visiting the club and more.
http://www.tollesburysc.com

Tollesbury3 Tollesbury2 Tollesbury

Tonight, however, I’d like to draw your attention to the club’s photo galleries.

The pictures above come from the Tollesbury Smack & Classic Yacht Race a few months ago in early September. Great shots! There are West Solent One-Designs here, a variety of smacks, and a little modern Drascombe Lugger.

For more images, see:
http://www.tollesburysc.com/photo-gallery/2006-galleries/smacks-and-classic-200/

While you’re there, it’s worth having a look around the site’s other departments, including the refit of the Charlotte Ellen a few years ago, and the page of photos of traditional boats found around the Blackwater.

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The Green Man arrives on Twelfth Night

Here’s a use for a boat you may not have thought of!

This is the Green Man arriving in central London for Twelfth Night. I meant to get some photos of this event yesterday afternoon but failed to do so because the weather in London was so grey and wet, so this one from a previous year will have to suffice. I hope my friend Tim, who was involved in the show and was completely sodden, dried out without catching anything unpleasant.

Anyway, to read about the Twelfth Night celebrations that take place by the Thames each year on January 6th, this is the place to go:
http://www.thelionspart.co.uk/twelfthnight/index.html

Green Man on Twelfth Night

Fishing in Scotland a century ago

Resources for Learning in Scotland (RLS) has what it calls a Pathfinder Pack on fishing in Scotland in the 1900s, when most Scottish fishing boats were powered by wind and muscle. But things were about to change: steam power had just arrived and the internal combustion engine began to be used later in the decade:

http://www.rls.org.uk/…/record.php?usi=000-000-001-269-L

The historical material is good but if you open the main site (http://www.rls.org.uk) and search for fishing a wealth of potentially very interesting images comes up in thumbnail form, but that’s all. Could this be the most frustrating website I’ve seen this year? Yes it could!!!

I could understand it if the photos were in danger of being used commercially in some way, but they’re not – in fact, they’re so small they’re not only painful to look at but would still be unprintable at 10 or more times their current size. Oh well… Perhaps if someone they might listen to could mention it?

Gavin Atkin's weblog for the sort of people who like looking inside boat sheds: old boats, traditional boats, boat building, restoration, the sea and the North Kent Coast

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