Category Archives: Working boats

Here’s a nice way to waste an hour

I did it this evening, and it was easy. I started by looking at the links page here at www.intheboatshed.net, and decided to have a look at the Wooden Ships broker’s list. Naturally, my eye was drawn by a Falmouth working boat, among other things. Take a peek, if you dare: http://www.woodenships.co.uk/
Naturally, I then wondered what else I might find… When up came this link:

http://www.stmawessailing.co.uk/sailing/fleets/workingboats.php

And this fabulous small gallery showing these the working boats with their full racing rigs. I gather they operate a voluntary limit of 1000sqft, and looking at the sails in these images it could be true:

http://www.stmawessailing.co.uk/imgal/imgal_viewgallery.php?cid=8

Looking at these images, it’s difficult to remember that these boats are also used to fish for oysters – in fact, with rather smaller rigs in place they’re a sail-powered oyster fishing fleet that continues to work the Fal Estuary and the area around the Roseland Peninsula today.

Finally, I suppose one might consider buying the one for sale at the Wooden Ships site. Click on the image below to go to their site. And while you’re there, there’s a nice little Harrison Butler just crying out for attention…

Falmouth Working Boat

Historic fishing boats in the Salmon Boat Collection

The Severn Salmon Boats Collection’s salmon punt is the last remaining boat of this kind in working condition; its strange and interesting shape can be traced back to the drawings dating from the Middle Ages as a picture on the Salmon Boat Collection site below shows. The photo here is one of mine, and links to a larger version if you click on it.

The collection’s stopnet boat is similarly the last original of a type that used to be seen in the rivers Wye and Severn.

The Salmon Boat Collection:
http://www.salmonboats.co.uk

For more working boats http://intheboatshed.net/?cat=5

Salmonboat480

The boats of the Excelsior Trust

The historic Lowestoft smack Excelsior was built in 1921 and is recognised by the National Maritime Museum as one of the top fifty most important vessels in our maritime heritage. And yet it’s possible for the ordinary joe to book time sailing on her for a day, several days or maybe a week to the Tall Ships Race, or perhaps to help other volunteers keep her in good condition.

Based at Lowestoft on the East Coast, the Excelsior Trust also maintains the 1884 Hull sailing trawler City of Edinboro’ and is restoring the Rye Harbour East Channel Punt Estralita. The Trust also runs the Excelsior Shipyard, which welcomes historic vessels for slipping. It’s well worth a visit, especially if you can take the opportunity to go sailing as well.

http://www.excelsiortrust.co.uk

Excelsior