Category Archives: wooden boat

More old photos of Scoter

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scoter, Count de la Chapelle, idle duck, bawley, lynher, maurice griffiths, wildfowling

scoter, Count de la Chapelle, idle duck, bawley, lynher, maurice griffiths, wildfowling scoter, Count de la Chapelle, idle duck, bawley, lynher, maurice griffiths, wildfowling scoter, Count de la Chapelle, idle duck, bawley, lynher, maurice griffiths, wildfowling

Doug Grierson has sent in some more old photographs that will no doubt delight the large numbers of people who have been following the Scoter story. Thanks Doug!

For more on this famous old bawley-derived yacht that was so admired by Maurice Griffiths and which passed through a long line of owners including artist Colin Grierson and son Doug, click here.

The first image is from a postcard sent by an earlier owner of Scoter to a recipient in Essex in 1907; Doug doesn’t know how or when it was passed to his mother.

The two photos of Scoter from 1994-5 at Woodbridge and Maldon show later coach roof and original windlass and circular fore-hatch; the final item is a scanned image of a water-colour by Colin Grierson dated 1932 showing the rig she had when he bought her in late 1930.

 

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Western skiff looking for a new home

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nigel irens ed burnett western skiff

nigel irens ed burnett western skiff nigel irens ed burnett western skiff

THE OWNER TELLS ME THIS BOAT HAS HOW FOUND A NEW HOME AND IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE!

Edward Beaumont has written to say that he needs to find a new home for his Nigel Irens– and Ed Burnett-designed Western skiff as he’s moving home. However, it needs to be the right home, as he’d like it to go to someone with a boathouse with access to river or lake: he feels a boat like this must be kept indoors, it would be saddened to think of it being left out, so much so that he’d rather burn it than have that happen.

Naturally, it has always been stored indoors, it comes with a trailer and trolley.

If you’re interested and think you might qualify, email me at gmatkin@gmail.com and I’ll pass your message along to Edward. Here’s what he says about the boat:

‘I suppose it was 11 years ago when I thought, what a very pretty little boat the Western skiff was! So I ordered the kit from Nigel Irens and built the boat in my garage with the aid of my younger son Sam, who was aged about 13 at the time. He’s in the Nike jumper in one of the photos, with me behind him. This was the day we turned the boat over and brought it out of the garage.

‘I love Nigel’s designs and would like to do a Romilly one day. I bought extra epoxy from the late great Tony Pink at Hill Head Chandlery (along with a lot of useful free advice), and also got a few extras from him, like a nice brass keel band that curls over the top of the stem in a way that pleases me. The boat is a little over weight, as I strengthened various things such as the mast support and added pads inside the transom to reinforce the rudder fixings.

‘Its a smashing little boat to row, really lovely for one or for two. It sails quite well, but you need to sit down low and its wet down there, so having sailed all my life and would say, I’d say this boat should be on a lake or river, but not on the sea. Also, if you go out for a picnic with the sailing gear (we had some great trips in the upper reaches of the Hamble) you have too much clobber to be able to row nicely, so in those circumstances it’s best to leave all the sailing stuff at home and just row.

‘That said, if you’re alone, the water is smooth, and there is a bit of breeze, it is nice to sail.

‘Called Little Faith (my wife said we would never finish it), the boat has not been wet for several years, but sits in the garage in which it was built on a nice combi trailer, with chocks under the stern. The sail is kept indoors and should be almost like new. The four Collars oars have leather on, but perhaps not in quite the right places, and I daresay that a few bits of string are missing.

‘The boat is finished in dark green with creamy white inside, and some varnish work, and I must say, I felt very proud at the launch – though that turned to shock when the mast rolled off the top of our van and knocking my elder son nearly unconscious!

‘I need to move this boat as the house is to be let. If someone comes along, and if I like them, I’d probably sell it for a lot less than the sum of all the bits cost me. But not if they are going to leave it outside or be silly with it, so it should probably be someone with a landing stage and boathouse. And if no-one suitable comes along I can always move the boat to my new house and stick it in another garage!

‘Best wishes

‘Edward Beaumont’

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Arthur Ransome fans work to buy Swallow replica at Turk’s film prop boat auction

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Arthur Ransome film boat Swallow for sale

Swallow is included in the Turk’s sale

Swallow, one of two dinghies made for a 1974 film of Arthur Ransome’s popular children’s novel Swallows & Amazons, is up for auction in a few days and Ransome enthusiasts are looking for supporters to help raise cash to buy her.

The idea behind the campaign is to get Swallow on the water so Ransome fans can have an experience just like in the books; anyone will be allowed to sail in her for a small fee, and those who have donated to the original appeal will be given credits towards an appropriate number of sailing visits.

Volunteers who skipper Swallow for the benefit of a non-sailing crew, drive her from place to place as needed, or undertake maintenance will not be required need to contribute. However, as the organisers of the bid say, the boat is not likely to be cheap, and they will need a lot of pledges to get their attempt to buy the boat off the ground. See the group’s website here: http://sites.google.com/site/swallowbid.

A separate bid to acquire the important 1906 steam launch Cygnet in the same sale has also been put together by the Heritage Steamboat Trust, the Thames Boats Trust and The Consuta Trust, which plan to bid for the important old craft and to exhibit and store her at Beale Park. The organisers believe they can access matching funds for 50 per cent of the purchase, but are also looking to enthusiasts for funds – as they say, if she was sold abroad or modified by a private buyer part of the UK’s marine heritage would be damaged or lost forever. For more information on the Cygnet project, see www.steamboattrust.org.uk/cygnet.htm.

The boats are part of an auction of boats used as film props currently to be held at Chatham by the long-established Thames boatyard Turk’sclick here for more on the sale.

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