Category Archives: Boating, boats, ships and the sea

British Sea-Fishermen, by Anson – part III, from Lincolnshire to Cornwall

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Hastings beach pictured by Cristall in 1808

‘Hastings is one of the most interesting fishing centres on the South Coast and if one studies early 19th century paintings and drawings one realises that
Hastings beach cannot have changed very much in the past hundred years.
Even the boats have retained their general lines…’

Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen

Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen

Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen Anson British Sea-Fishermen

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More photos and a new boat from Nick Smith

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New 12ft Nick Smith runabout at Salcombe

New Nick Smith 12-footer at Salcombe

Bumble fully laden Bumble at the Stuart Turner centenary regatta Puffin at Buckler\'s Hard

While I was whooping it up in Paris this weekend, another set of photos arrived from boatbuilder Nick Smith over the weekend. Here’s what he had to say:

‘I am back from NZ and have just completed a 12 foot six runabout, mahogany on oak, pictured here in Salcombe harbour – that’s my brother sitting on the pontoon.

The other pictures are of the sistership Bumble which you have seen before, on the Thames. In the first, she’s fully laden and under full power. The second comes from a Stuart Turner event.

‘I will be exhibiting again at Beale Park Thames Traditional Boat Show, from the 6th to 8th June this year.

‘The last picture is of the steam launch SL Puffin under steam on the Beaulieu River.

‘Regards, Nick”

Thanks Nick – I’m sure intheboatshed.net readers will admire your boats!

Nick’s a member of the Wooden Boatbuilder’s Trade Association, and you can read more about him here:
Nick Smith at the WBTA website

Take a look at our extensive coverage of last year’s Beale Park Boat Show.

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Volunteer wooden boat restorers at Goolwa, on Australia’s Murray Lakes

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Armfield slip, on the Murray Lakes

Boats at the Armfield slip, close to Goolwa

This picture came from our very good friend and supporter Jeff Cole. Here’s what he said about it:

‘This is Armfield Slip, the base of a volunteer wooden boat restoration organisation in the original buildings of the Armfield family of boatbuilders.

‘The organisation teaches techniques and builds and restores boats. The example under the lean-to is a station supply and ‘picnic’ boat from a property on the River Murray. She’s now restored and fully operational, and I rode in her at the last Goolwa Wooden Boat Festival.

‘The open boat in the foreground is a ships boat from HMSAS Protector of 1884, the only ship in the South Australian Colonial Navy. She had a long history including deployment to China with the Aussie contingent to the Boxer Rebellion. (see link below) There are plans to replicate the ships boat as it is beyond restoration.

‘There are several boats on the lake that the Armfield group have restored, and a local schools boatbuilding programme is very active, financed in part by raffling a boat they build at each festival. The current project is a large yacht.

‘The lower Murray Lakes face permanent acidification because of the long-term drying of the Murray catchment and the over-allocation of what water there is. The resulting ecological disaster overtaking the Murray’s drought-ravaged lower lakes has hit home, and it was recently confirmed that they could be deliberately flooded with seawater: South Australian Water Security Minister Karlene Maywald said opening barriers to let in the sea was an option that could be considered this year.

That fact that the action is even being thought about Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert underlines the severity of the crisis in the Murray’s lower reaches.’ Read more here. The river will probably look totally different at the next Festival, if it goes ahead.’

Thanks Jeff – as always we’re grateful for your photos and explanations.