Category Archives: Steam power

The Steamship London and Foul Weather Call

The sad tale of the Steamship London, which is said to have sunk in a storm in the Bay of Biscay as a result of being overloaded. If you’ve ever wondered what disasters prompted the legal changes that brought in the Plimsoll Line, this is one of them.

Foul Weather Call can be thought of as a hornpipe or a reel, I think. Either way it comes from a 19th collection of tunes owned by the Welch family, who lived in the little Sussex port of Bosham.

 

 

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The story (and song) of the first radio rescue at sea, 23rd January 1909

‘Jack Binns, Jack Binns, the bravest of all the crew,
Jack Binns, Jack Binns, The world loves and honours you!’

The first rescue at sea that depended on radio was a big one involving a collision between two liners, and it inspired a music hall song. They don’t write them quite like that any more…

There’s a hole in the side of the ship Jack Binns, The Captain above he cried,
Give a message at once to the wandering winds, Aye aye Sir, Jack Binns replied,
The Captain was brave but braver was he,
Who sat in his room with his hand on the key…

‘The first radio rescue at sea took place on 23 January 1909. On that day a Morse code distress call—CQD—was sent by White Star Line’s Republic (1903), which in dense fog had collided with the Lloyd Italiano liner Florida (1905). Republic’s signal was detected and relayed by the nearby Nantucket Island station. The US Revenue Cutter Gresham picked up the message from Nantucket and immediately headed to the collision site to help the victims.

‘Both Republic and Florida were heavily damaged, and Republic eventually sank. Yet passengers and crew who survived the initial crash were safely evacuated to Florida and White Star’s Baltic, which had also received the distress call and steamed to the scene. Two Republic passengers, asleep in their cabins, were killed when Florida’s bow sliced into the ship.’

Read on…

Does anyone know where drawings of RYS Wanderer can be found?

Jonathan Griffiths has written to ask whether anyone knows where he can see drawings of the RYS Wanderer, which was built at Greenock by Robert Steele & Co 1878, and wondered if your subscribers might help in locating such drawings if
they still exist.

‘Her name was then then changed name to Vagus in 1889 and then to Consuelo while in the ownership of the Earl of Crawford in 1902 – so I do not think she is the same Consuelo that appeared in the Yachtsman in 1901, as this was a two masted steam yacht.

Please leave a note in the comments link, or write to me at gmatkin@gmail.com and I’ll forward your message to him.