Category Archives: Sailing cruisers

Sailing yachts used for cruising, or as cruiser-racers.

New edition of John Leather’s Albert Strange now available from Lodestar

Product-Shot-Albert-Strange-510x679

A new edition of the long out-of-print book Albert Strange — Yacht Designer and Artist, by John Leather and members of The Albert Strange Association, is now available from Lodestar Books and all good maritime bookstores.

Strange was seminal figure in the development of the small cruising yacht, and the book includes many of his design drawings, together with newly located works of art, delightful illustrated cruising yarns from century-old editions of Yachting Monthly of a century ago, and more recent boat photos. And there’s also a foreword by Iain Oughtred.

The book is in a large format, with 224 pages and 12 pages of plates, and costs just £20 post-free in the UK (a little more to other countries).

The ASA owns the copyright of the book, and will receives the author royalty on all sales.

Arthur Beale’s talk: the history of Whitstable block and yacht fittings maker Barton Marine

RSJ Barton Ltd of Whitstable

The history of East Coast block makers Barton Marine of Whitstable is the subject of next month’s talk at Arthur Beale Yacht Chandlers in Shaftsbury Avenue, London, from 6:45pm on Thursday the 5th March 2015.

The talk is to be presented by  Barton Marine sales manager Christian Brewer.

Barton Marine is well known for making blocks. The company was established as RSJ Barton in 1948 by Whitstable shipwright and boat builder Ron Barton, who was was one of the first to use the fabric-based laminated plastic known as Tufnol, and also one of the first to use stainless steel to make blocks for yachting that were much lighter and stronger than previously achievable.

In the 1960s the introduction of glass reinforced plastic boats brought sailing to a larger audience, and demand for Barton’s lightweight and cost effective products continued to grow.

Ron realised that Tufnol was labour-intensive and therefore costly – so set about re-designing the entire Barton product range to become the first marine company to use a new plastic injection moulding process using revolutionary fibre glass-reinforced plastic materials.

It should prove to be a fascinating tale, and there are rumours that there may be some interesting East Coast marine engineers in the audience.

Book a place by emailing: talks@arthurbeale.co.uk

The entry fee is £5.00 – but you’ll get their money back if you make a shop purchase to the value of £15.00 or more. Attendees will also get a special discount voucher to use when purchasing Barton Products from Arthur Beale’s.

 

Jennie of Paglesham starts her new life with Giacomo de Stefano

This is Classic Boat person of the year Giacomo de Stefano taking delivery of Jennie of Paglesham, which he intends to restore to cruising condition at Faversham during the later part of next summer after he has completed his Man on the Snow project.

The fun ‘yacht in a bottle’ was made by previous owner Rhodri Williams during his time in the Navy, in fact during the first Iraq War.

Giacomo tells me that Jennie is soft in only a few areas, and I hope it’s true because he tells me that it’s all my fault that he bought her following a post I published on this website a while back.

Jennie of Paglesham was built by Frank Shuttlewood in 1946/7 from the bones of his grandfather’s 1885 clinker-built boat Jennie. An article about Jennie by the late Maurice Griffiths appeared in YMApril 1948. See the link above for more information.

Man on the Snow is an expedition to travel from Oslo in Sweden to Nordkapp at the far North of Norway by sustainable means, and follows the earlier Man on the River in which Giacomo, with the help of friends, built an Iain Oughtred-designed sailing dinghy and rowed and sailed all the way from London to Istanbul, again using sustainable means so far as possible, which of course meant he had no engine. I think we should all wish him luck with both endeavours!