Category Archives: Barges and wherries

Barges and wherries and other working boats originally for carrying cargoes

More photos from the 2016 Medway Barge Match

This time, it’s a selection I shot using a film camera…

Aboard Cambria for the Medway barge match

Read about Cambria here, and about the Medway Barge Match here. Our new friend photographer Rob Powell was on board and I guess he may put some of his shots on his weblog, On the Thames.

Spot the Lady of the Lea stuck on an island. I hope she and her folks are all right…

PS – While we were racing, East Coast ditch crawling maven Nick Ardley was attending the launch of a new steel built Thames sailing barge, the Blue Dolphin. They do say with her smooth bottom, she’ll be quick and could be an interesting contender in barge racing in future years… See Nick’s weblog piece here.

National Historic Ships flagship awards go to MV Balmoral, the shortboat Kennet, and the sailing smack Excelsior

National Historic Ships UK has announced its seventh flagship awards including two regional awards:

  • MV Balmoral for an outstanding and extensive UK programme. The recently-formed MV Balmoral Fund Ltd submitted an extensive and very well presented public UK–wide coastal cruising programme ranging from Scotland, through North Wales and the Bristol Channel and the South coast, round to London

Regional flagship awards have been made to:

  • the shortboat Kennet, in recognition of an intensive programme of visits within the Shipshape Mersey Network, focusing on the Leeds-Liverpool canal. In view of the exemplary quality of this application, the judges decided to make an exceptional award of £350
  • the sailing smack Excelsior, in recognition of her 2016 Shipshape East Anglia programme, which extends across the North Sea and the South coast of England, and even Newfoundland

The new regional awards are intended to be a recognition that not all vessels have the capacity to sail around the UK and abroad, but may still be undertaking a worthwhile programme of public events and raising awareness of historic vessels and our maritime heritage.

The criteria still require vessel owners to demonstrate seasonal programmes that engage with the public through festivals, demonstrations, offering on-board cruises, quayside visits, educational programmes, participation in races and similar activities, and flagships are expected to promote National Historic Ships UK.

The National Flagship of the Year receives £500 to spend on the vessel, and the special Flagship Broad Pennant (which has become a feature of the award) to fly at the masthead. The Regional Flagships normally receive £250 to be spent on the vessel, along with a Regional Flagship Broad Pennant.

National Historic Ships UK advises the Department of Culture, Media & Sport and a range of grant giving organisations on priorities for ship conservation and is the official voice for historic vessels in the UK. It maintains the National Register of Historic Vessels, which lists over a thousand significant historic vessels.