A photo gallery of the ancient port of Hythe

Hythe 5

Ancient graffito of a sailing ship known as a hulc, dated around 1450. The structure on the bows is said to be a platform for archers added to merchant ships when going to war

This small gallery of photos is from Hythe on Kent’s English Channel Coast. Among the shots are:

  • two ancient drawings of ancient ships scratched into a pillar
  • a monument to the memory of Captain Robert Finnisa native of this town and port, who was killed in the service of his Country on board his Majesty’s Sloop of war Queen Charlotte which he Commanded on Lake Erie, Upper Canada, in an engagement with an American Squadron of very Superior Force
  • the town hall, formerly a guildhall, dated 1794. It features a distinctive projecting clock bearing the town’s crest
  • the striking helmet of a suit of armour bearing the head of a deer (I’ve no idea about the history of this and it’s not at all boaty but it did strike me as intriguing)
  • some British people beach fishing in absurdly unpleasant conditions (the British can be inexplicable, even to me)

Hythe is one of the Cinque Ports, as the seal seen in a couple of the images shows.

The church at Hythe is a magnificent structure that includes an impressive mediaeval ossuary if you like that kind of thing (I don’t).

This entry was posted in Culture: songs, stories, photography and art, History, Locations, Sailing ships, Traditional clinker, wooden boat, Working boats. Bookmark the permalink.

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