A harbour stroll at Keadby Lock, Alkborough and Barton upon Humber

Keadby Lock Alkborough Barton on Humber and Caistor 6

Humber sloop Spider T at Keadby Lock

This harbour stroll from North Lincolnshire – my home county – includes the magnificent Humber sloop Spider T (thanks for the pleasant evening and comfy stay Mal!), the confluence of the River Trent and the Humber Estuary from the wonderful 12th century turf maze at Alkborough, Alkborough Flats (once hard-won farmland, now tidal to reduce flooding elsewhere), pub signs (often a guide to what places were once famous for), the Humber Bridge and the harbour at Barton on Humber.

I must say Barton’s particularly interesting – there are some lovely boats waiting to be rescued in the boatyard, an impressive lighter, what looks like a proper Colin Archer, the fine Ferry Queen (presumably a retired ferry from somewhere), a sweet small clinker-built sailer, and a magnificent ropery building that’s now sadly divided. And there’s that wonderful windmill – though sadly it has long lost its sails.

And what’s that fabulous white sailing yacht with the beautiful gold leaf on her bows? Answers on a post card please to… (The comment link below will do… )

See more of Barton here.

Most of the shots were taken with a FujiFilm S200, a few with an HTC mobile phone.

This entry was posted in Boatbuilders and restorers, Culture: songs, stories, photography and art, Locations, Racing yacht, Small boats, Traditional carvel, Traditional clinker, wooden boat, Working boats. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to A harbour stroll at Keadby Lock, Alkborough and Barton upon Humber

  1. It’s always apit to see how beauty lies to rot. It should be a joint duty to bring the knowledge to the boating community that wooden boat are a lot more satisfying than plastic ones, that if being cared for on a regular base isn’t that much more work than the maintenance on GRP boats. Same for steel boats. How often have I heard from customers” Oh, when there is ascratch in the sheating, the steel will start to rust immediately.” Whar about a scratch in GRP? If the gelcoat is hurt the GRP will start to rot anyway. Personally I think GRP is very much overestimated. And I lovingly would take one or two of these boats to restore them, but, alas, sadly you won’t find someone to py for it.

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