Solid advice on sailing small boats from the West Wight Potters

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This little table was written for the US version of the West Wight Potter shows how very rapidly the pressure on a sailing rig rises with wind speed in mind – and similar tables could be drawn up for other sailing boats.

It comes from Many Ways to Potter, a handy guide to sailing these little centreboard sloops that includes lots of good advice for those sailing other small boats, including on how to manage in strong winds and rough water. Read it here.

Thanks for pointing this one out Paul Mullings!

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3 Responses to Solid advice on sailing small boats from the West Wight Potters

  1. Tiernan Roe says:

    Love it, 40kts emotion Terror. I’d be bloody terrified in 40kts in a Potter. I think it would be crash position time. Head down ad kiss a$$ goodbye.

  2. John Button says:

    For more derring do in a WWP, read the designer’s account of a N Sea delivery trip. gales included.
    http://www.wwpotterowners.com/SailingStories9.html

    If you are interested in British WWP, go to the Yahoo group
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/westwightpotter-UK

    Static wind pressure is proportional to wind speed squared. On a flat surface (approximating a sail) it is about
    P = 0.003xVxV
    where P = pressure in lb/sq.ft
    V = wind speed mph
    eg for 20mph, P = 1.3lb/sq.ft

    For a real sail,you need to allow for heeling, the apparent wind speed, camber etc. So ‘approximation’ is very appropriate.

    Cheers all – and Happy Christmas

    John Button

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